Seso ( con s ), mentiras y juegos de guerra.

Otros ejércitos, operaciones, técnicas de combate

Moderadores: José Luis, PatricioDelfosse

Responder
Avatar de Usuario
V.Manstein
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 771
Registrado: Lun Jun 13, 2005 6:28 pm
Ubicación: Cantabria/Canarias

Seso ( con s ), mentiras y juegos de guerra.

Mensaje por V.Manstein » Lun May 22, 2006 4:02 am

Un asunto muy interesante es la relación entre el wargaming y la evolución de la doctrina militar a lo largo de los tiempos. Desde luego es una historia que en el periodo de entreguerra y la IIGM tiene mucho de qué hablar. Les presento un artículo muy recomendable que hace una reflexión sobre este asunto y creo que es muy acertado en sus planteamientos en lo referente al periodo entreguerras y en particular al wargaming alemán de la IIGM:
It can be argued that the most potentially decisive wargames of World War II were never played. When Hitler came to power he quickly put a stop to the strategic-level war games played at the Ministry of Defense. He considered them a pseudo-intellectual pursuit. He would make the future strategic decisions for Germany based upon "blood and soil," that is on his own genius and intuition. Germany nevertheless continued to wargame operational and tactical problems. If you consider Germany fought well at the operational level but blundered at the strategic level, the possible impact of allowing these games to be continued can only be guessed at.


Still, there may not have been any effect on history, if Hitler had not listened to the wargame results. In 1938 General Beck, then Chief of the German General Staff, conducted a wargame of a German campaign against Czechoslovakia. While the wargame predicted a German victory, the fight would be so costly that it would weaken Germany to the point she could be conquered by any of her neighbors. Hitler ignored these findings, as he believed the Czechs would not fight.


This should not suggest that wargames did not play an enormous role in the German war effort from start to finish. In early 1939, before the war began, the Germans wargamed their attack on Poland. While they certainly would have won that campaign anyway, the wargame seems to have had some effect in speeding up their victory. More importantly, differences between the wargame's predictions and the Army's actual performance was one of the motivations for the rigorous training regime implemented between the victory over Poland and the offensive in the West.


Also, Hitler was not above sighting a wargame when its outcome confirmed his inclinations. In the Spring of 1940, a then relatively obscure Lieutenant Colonel by the name of Manstein, proposed an innovative plan for the coming offensive. Instead on swinging through Holland and Belgium as Schlieffen had proposed 35 years earlier, Manstein proposed a massive armored thrust through the Ardennes Forest, across the Meuse River, and on to the Channel coast. In so doing he would cut off the British Expeditionary Force and the most modern elements of the French Army. Initially his ideas received a chilly reception by the high command.


He persisted though, wargaming his plan at his headquarters and showing that the plan could work. Well, thought the high command, perhaps there was something wrong with his wargame. His plan was wargamed again at higher headquarters, and again the plan worked. Perhaps, the plan would work on paper but tanks could not actually negotiate the Ardennes. Next, a field wargame was conducted over similar terrain within Germany and again the plan worked. At this point Hitler got involved. He had been wanting some plan that promised a more decisive outcome but, this early in the war, he was still reluctant to overrule his generals. Now, with the endorsement of the wargames, he ordered the change. The result was a French defeat far faster and more complete then would have otherwise been possible.


Wargames could also discourage. German games played before the war on the subject of a strategic bombing campaign against Britain, and war games played after the fall of France on a cross-Channel invasion, both showed how difficult such operations would be. When the actual Battle of Britain proved indecisive as predicted the discouraging predictions of the cross channel invasion wargame were taken even more seriously.


Hence a wargame predicting disaster should the Germans attack the Soviet Union could have had some effect. True, after conquering France Hitler was far more secure politically. Still, many prominent generals did not like the idea of invading the Soviet Union in general and they did not like the plan that came from Hitler's headquarters in particular. Hence, the usual pre-invasion war game was unusually important. Given the massive size and depth of the operation, the Germans conducted what was probably the largest, longest war game to that date, and possibly of all time.


Operation Otto , was conducted over three separate occasions as the Germans attempted to wargame a long campaign through to its conclusion. At the end of their third session, they had only wargamed through to early November. Yet no fourth session was scheduled. One reason was that the war game predicted the destruction of 240 Soviet Divisions, with only 60 remaining, and a front line that stretched from the gates of Leningrad to the edge of Moscow and deep into the Ukraine. Surly the Soviets could not recover at such a point. Those officers who continued to have misgivings about the invasion after the Operation Otto, felt they had no military basis to object.


Ironically, in the actual campaign on the actual "date" that Operation Otto ended the Germans had advanced about as far as predicted by the wargame and had actually destroyed more (248) Soviet divisions. However, instead of the Soviets being down to 60 divisions they still had 220 divisions. How could the war game be so wrong? They got most of the details right as far as the capabilities of individual Soviet divisions and their reconnaissance had given them a very accurate picture of the Soviet order of battle at the beginning of the campaign. It was what they did not depict that misled them. The Soviets had a plan to mobilize entire new divisions upon the beginning of hostilities. The German wargame made no provision for new Soviet divisions. To make matters worse, beyond the time period wargamed the Soviets acquired an old ally, the Russian Winter. Expecting victory, German forces were woefully unprepared for winter fighting. It is intriguing to speculate how history might have been different if the Germans had held a fourth session of Operation Otto.


At about the time of the first phase of the Operation Otto war game, the Red Army was also wargaming a German invasion. Though much shorter, this wargame also shaped the war. The Russian plan for a German invasion was to initially stand on the defensive wearing the Germans down in a fighting retreat. Then, when the Germans were tired, the Soviets would counterattack and drive the invader from Russian territory. While the plan worked – in the wargame – the German side penetrated far deeper into the Soviet Union then anticipated. When Stalin was briefed on the outcome he was outraged.


This exercise appeared to have three impacts. Stalin blamed the deep penetration on the Red Army waiting too long to counterattack. This may help explain the premature counter-attacks made in the actual invasion. The wargame did alert Soviet leaders to the possibility of deep penetrations by a German invasion, so the actual German advance was probably somewhat less of a shock. Finally, Stalin concluded that one of the reasons the Red Army did so poorly was that the young general playing the Germans had done a brilliant job. Already well thought of by Stalin, this increased the general's stature further. This general's name? Zhukov.
The Germans made heavy use of wargaming throughout the war. To describe all of their efforts would require a paper the length of this work. Here is just a sample.


While Operation Bodyguard, the deception plan for the Normandy invasion, had confirmed German suspicions that the main invasion would come at Calais, the Allies were not able to hide all their preparations across the Channel from Normandy. The Germans concluded that these preparations were being made for a feint, an attempt to trick them on the location of real invasion. Still, they conducted a wargame of an Allied landing at Normandy and concluded that an Allied lodgment was probable! This caused considerable concern in the high command. Though they may have joked about the ugly American uniforms, they had come respect the initiative shown up and down the chain of command of the American Army. If the feint was successful the Americans might decide to make the feint their main effort.


The Germans therefore ordered reinforcements into Normandy. The regiment that made Omaha Beach so bloody was one of those reinforcements. So was the 21st Panzer Division, the unit that prevented the British from taking Caen on D-Day. The invasion would have been much more difficult if it had not occurred before two-thirds of the planned reinforcements arrived.


Ironically, while one German war game made D-Day far more costly for the Allies, another actually helped the Allied cause. When the invasion took place many key commanders were away from their headquarters as they were on their way to a second wargame. This wargame would test how well they could meet an invasion of Normandy when all the planned reinforcements were in place. The delays caused by key commanders being away from their command posts actually helped that invasion succeed.


Finally, the Germans' wargame of the "Middle" Battle of the Ardennes may have been the most unusual game of the war. After the German Army was chased across France, resistance began to stiffen. Early in the Fall Field Marshal Model, commander of Army Group B ordered the Fifth Panzer Army, the German formation defending the Ardennes sector, to conduct a wargame of an American attack. On 2 November 1944, while the wargame was going on the Americans actually attacked. Instead of dismissing the game Field Marshal Model (Who was present at the wargame) sent only the commanders of units in contact back to their commands. He then directed that actual American movements be fed into the game. The Germans then wargamed out each of their orders before executing them. Finally, it was time to commit the reserves. The Field Marshal Model called the commander of the reserves over to the wargame map, personally briefed him on his mission and sent him on his way. It is difficult to imagine the leader of a counterattack ever having better situational awareness.



http://www.strategypage.com/articles/de ... eader=long
Última edición por V.Manstein el Lun May 22, 2006 4:20 am, editado 1 vez en total.
Soldat im 20.Jahrhundert

Avatar de Usuario
Calígula
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 666
Registrado: Jue Jul 14, 2005 11:25 pm
Ubicación: No se dice este país, sino ESPAÑA

Mensaje por Calígula » Jue May 25, 2006 9:32 am

In the Spring of 1940, a then relatively obscure Lieutenant Colonel by the name of Manstein, proposed an innovative plan for the coming offensive ..., Manstein proposed a massive armored thrust through the Ardennes Forest, across the Meuse River, and on to the Channel coast. In so doing he would cut off the British Expeditionary Force and the most modern elements of the French Army. Initially his ideas received a chilly reception by the high command.


He persisted though, wargaming his plan at his headquarters and showing that the plan could work. Well, thought the high command, perhaps there was something wrong with his wargame. His plan was wargamed again at higher headquarters, and again the plan worked. Perhaps, the plan would work on paper but tanks could not actually negotiate the Ardennes. Next, a field wargame was conducted over similar terrain within Germany and again the plan worked. At this point Hitler got involved. He had been wanting some plan that promised a more decisive outcome but, this early in the war, he was still reluctant to overrule his generals. Now, with the endorsement of the wargames, he ordered the change.
Pero fue porque el 10 de enero de 1940 cuando un Messerschmitt con los planes del caso amarillo muy similar a Schlieffen, aterrizo en el aerodromo belga de Mechelen-sur-Meuse, capturando la informacion los aliados. Despues de esto, se opto por cambiar obligatoriamente al Plan de Manstein "Golpe de Hoz" que ya era del agrado de Hitler y no por sus exitos en los juegos de guerra. Otra cosa es como dice el texto, los juegos realizados a ultima instancia en Alemania preveian el exito del paso por la ardenas.
Heinrich Heine [i]Allí donde se queman los libros, se terminaran quemando personas[/i]

Avatar de Usuario
José Luis
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 9358
Registrado: Sab Jun 11, 2005 3:06 am
Ubicación: España

Mensaje por José Luis » Jue May 25, 2006 3:30 pm

¡Hola a todos!

Lo de que el plan para iniciar la campaña del Oeste se vino abajo por los documentos confiscados en el vuelo siniestrado es un mito. No fue ese accidente el que echó a perder la campaña, sino la meteorología (y las largas del OKH).

Y es parcialmente inexacto atribuir a Manstein la exclusividad de la idea con que se desarrolló finalmente el plan operacional para la campaña del Oeste de mayo de 1940. Hitler tuvo esa idea independientemente de Manstein, y documentalmente antes que Manstein. Naturalmente, Hitler era incapaz por sí mismo de desarrollar esa idea en un plan operacional; no tenía preparación profesional militar para ello.

Fue Schmundt, el ayudante de Hitler para la Wehrmacht, quien descubrió el plan de Manstein en una visita que hizo, creo recordar que en enero o febrero de 1940, al cuartel general de Rundstedt. Cuando, más tarde, Manstein fue destinado al mando de un cuerpo de ejército, Hitler dio una cena de recepción a todos los nuevos comandantes de cuerpo de ejército. Fue en esa cena cuando Hitler conoció del plan de Manstein, y a partir de ahí se escribió la historia.

Esto todo lo hablo de memoria, pero puedo documentar paso a paso el proceso que finalmente engendró el ataque a Sedán. La idea de lanzar el principal ataque contra Sedán brotó en Hitler ya en diciembre (o antes, ahora no recuerdo exactamente) de 1939.

Saludos cordiales
José Luis
"Dioses, no me juzguéis como un dios
sino como un hombre
a quien ha destrozado el mar" (Plegaria fenicia)

Avatar de Usuario
hawat
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 666
Registrado: Sab Jul 16, 2005 8:49 pm
Ubicación: Saipán

Mensaje por hawat » Jue May 25, 2006 3:55 pm

Jum. ¿Que los alemanes no tuvieron en cuenta que los rusos iban a levantar más divisiones? Me parece una "aproximación para la simulación" un poco bestia.

¿Que pensaban que iban a hacer? Lo habitual siempre que se declara una guerra es movilizar mas efectivos... y ademas, teniendo precisamente en cuenta que ya sabian que el avance iba a ser rápido, tales divisiones de repuesto iban a poder organizarse muy cerca del propio "lugar del tomate", asi que aún eran mas peligrosas en cuanto que el desplazamiento iba a ser mínimo (Comparado, sobre todo, con el de los refuerzos alemanes)
"Hubo un tiempo, no hace mucho, en el que le dimos a este mundo una guerra con la que jamás había soñado..."

Avatar de Usuario
Calígula
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 666
Registrado: Jue Jul 14, 2005 11:25 pm
Ubicación: No se dice este país, sino ESPAÑA

Mensaje por Calígula » Vie May 26, 2006 6:03 am

José Luis escribió:Lo de que el plan para iniciar la campaña del Oeste se vino abajo por los documentos confiscados en el vuelo siniestrado es un mito
Acabas de echar por tierra todo aquello en lo que creí, y por lo que se sustentaban mis pilares morales. La opción ya más deseable seria cometer suicidio arrojándome por un barranco enrollado en una alfombra, para reunirme con el gran Rey Mufasa en el gueto del cielo. :lol: :wink: A ti José Luis, te dejare mi DVD
Fuera coñas, yo jamas he leido algo que aclarara el incidente en Belgica como una patraña, y por ello hice aquella afirmacion.
http://media.wiley.com/product_data/exc ... 394319.pdf
Heinrich Heine [i]Allí donde se queman los libros, se terminaran quemando personas[/i]

Avatar de Usuario
José Luis
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 9358
Registrado: Sab Jun 11, 2005 3:06 am
Ubicación: España

Mensaje por José Luis » Vie May 26, 2006 6:41 am

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Siempre consigues hacerme reír. :D

No es que fuera una patraña, amigo Calígula, pero su importancia está sobredimensionada. Hitler se enfadó por el incidente, pero respondió razonablemente bien. Siguió adelante con su obstinación de iniciar la campaña, pero el tiempo se lo impidió. Al cabo de unos días canceló los planes. Pero la razón no fue el siniestro del avión.

Un abrazo y nunca pierdas ese envidiable sentido del humor.
José Luis
"Dioses, no me juzguéis como un dios
sino como un hombre
a quien ha destrozado el mar" (Plegaria fenicia)

Avatar de Usuario
beltzo
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 1343
Registrado: Jue Sep 29, 2005 8:49 am

Mensaje por beltzo » Vie May 26, 2006 8:22 am

Hola a Todos:

Es muy posible que el plan de Manstein se hubiese llevado a cabo aunque no hubiese estado por medio el incidente de Reinberger, pero el caso es que el incidente ocurrió y no creo que se pueda desechar como causa principal, (aun no siendo la única), del cambio de planes, todos los planes que estaban en la carpeta de Reinberger se cambiaron, pero sin embargo la toma de Eben Emael se llevó a cabo tal como estaba prevista y curiosamente este plan no estaba entre la documentación de Reinberger.

Saludos
"Si mi teoría de la relatividad es exacta, los alemanes dirán que soy alemán y los franceses que soy ciudadano del mundo. Pero sino, los franceses dirán que soy alemán, y los alemanes que soy judío". Albert Einstein

Avatar de Usuario
José Luis
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 9358
Registrado: Sab Jun 11, 2005 3:06 am
Ubicación: España

Mensaje por José Luis » Vie May 26, 2006 5:05 pm

¡Buenos días a todos!

No entiendo muy bien lo que quieres decir, Beltzo. En el plan "Amarillo" que Hitler había ordenado ejecutar para el 17 de enero de 1940, Manstein no tenía ni arte ni parte. Pero veamos los hechos, que son más demoledores que las opiniones.

El 19 de octubre de 1939 el OKH, a instancias de Hitler, cursó las primeras directrices de “Amarillo”. Pocos días después Hitler comentó con sarcasmo a Keitel y Jodl que el plan de Halder no era diferente del plan de Schlieffen de antes de la IGM: “No puedes volver con una operación como esa dos veces. Les diré a ustedes dos algo sobre esto en los próximos días”.

En esas fechas, finales de octubre, Hitler ya tenía en mente la idea de ejecutar un gran envolvimiento encabezado por las formaciones blindadas atacando hacia la costa entre el Mosa y Arras y Amiens. Tras conversar con sus generales el 25 de octubre en la Cancillería del Reich, el general von Bock escribió en su diario que el Führer: “dijo en respuesta a una pregunta de Brauchitsch que desde el principio él había tenido la siguiente idea y deseo: realizar la principal ofensiva solamente al sur del Mosa….para que por nuestro avance en dirección casi oeste y luego noroeste, las fuerzas enemigas metidas en Bélgica por nuestro empuje serán aisladas y destruidas. Brauchitsch y Halder obviamente fueron cogidos por sorpresa, y se originó un ‘vivo’ debate sobre esa idea”.

El 10 de enero de 1940, discutiendo con sus generales sobre “Amarillo”, Hitler decidió que el ataque comenzaría siete días después, el 17 de enero. Al día siguiente, 11 de enero, Hitler se enteró del siniestro aéreo de la víspera en la frontera belga y los documentos que llevaba el mayor de la Luftwaffe. Pero aun así Hitler no alteró su decisión de ejecutar “Amarillo” el día 17. A las 03:15 horas p.m. lo confirmó. El día 13 le entregaron a Hitler un informe meteorológico negativo para “Amarillo”, por lo que por la tarde Hitler ordenó que se detuvieran todos los movimientos preparatorios, posponiendo “Amarillo” provisionalmente por tres días. Pero el panorama meteorológico empeoró. Hitler afirmó: “Si no podemos contar con al menos ocho días de buen tiempo, entonces tendremos que suspenderlo hasta la primavera”. Como los informes meteorológicos no mejoraron, el día 16 por la tarde ordenó desmontar la ofensiva hasta la primavera.

Asunto Manstein. Schmundt se fue de gira al Frente Occidental por encargo de Hitler a finales de enero de 1940. El 1 de febrero estaba de vuelta. Se había enterado en Koblenz, cuartel general del grupo de ejércitos de Rundstedt, que Manstein se oponía al plan actual del OKH para el ataque a Francia, siendo partidario, en cambio, de un plan alternativo que era muy similar a la idea que Hitler llevaba debatiendo con sus generales desde octubre de 1939. También se enteró de que el OKH había retirado a Manstein del estado mayor de Rundstedt y lo habían destinado a un mando de cuerpo de ejército.

El 13 de febrero de 1940 Hitler decidió ante Jodl que comprometería el grueso de su blindaje en la ruptura de Sedán. El 17 de febrero tuvo lugar la cena que Hitler ofreció a los nuevos comandantes de cuerpo. Entonces habló con Manstein, quien le aseguró que el nuevo plan era el único medio de conseguir una victoria aplastante por tierra. Al día siguiente, 18 de febrero, Hitler dictó el nuevo plan operacional a Brauchitsch y Halder. El 24 de febrero, el OKH cursó la nueva directriz para "Amarillo".

Todos estos detalles y fechas están documentados. Yo he seguido la relación de Irving (Hitler's War), pero hay muchas más obras y estudios específicos donde se soporta lo mismo.

Estos son los hechos y su cronología. Luego están los mitos.

Saludos cordiales
José Luis
"Dioses, no me juzguéis como un dios
sino como un hombre
a quien ha destrozado el mar" (Plegaria fenicia)

Avatar de Usuario
beltzo
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 1343
Registrado: Jue Sep 29, 2005 8:49 am

Mensaje por beltzo » Vie May 26, 2006 9:38 pm

Estimado José Luis:

Yo no dudo de esa cronología ni de esos hechos, es más, en cuanto que las urgencias de Hitler por realizar la ofensiva en el oeste eran irrealizables debido a la climatología, estoy seguro de que el plan de Manstein que coincidía con la idea preconcebida de Hitler, se hubiese realizado independientemente de todo lo demás, también se suma el hecho de que este retraso daba tiempo a realizar el redespliegue necesario para ello.

Ahora yo hago la siguiente pregunta: Supongamos que no existe el plan de Manstein, tras el incidente de Reinberger, ¿se hubiese llevado a cabo el plan amarillo tal como estaba concebido? Yo no lo creo, a no ser que se llevara a cabo de forma inmediata ese plan estaba quemado.

En cuanto a mitos, el de Reinberger no lo es, el incidente fue muy real y por ello creo que hay que tenerlo también en cuenta, aunque ciertamente la climatología fuera el factor más decisivo en el cambio de planes.

Saludos
"Si mi teoría de la relatividad es exacta, los alemanes dirán que soy alemán y los franceses que soy ciudadano del mundo. Pero sino, los franceses dirán que soy alemán, y los alemanes que soy judío". Albert Einstein

Responder

Volver a “Temas generales”

TEST