Räder versus Wegener. Ni Mahaniano ni Tirpitziano...

El impacto de la Gran Guerra en el pensamiento militar. Cambios y evolución en las doctrinas militares. Regulaciones de campaña.

Moderadores: José Luis, Francis Currey

Avatar de Usuario
V.Manstein
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 774
Registrado: Lun Jun 13, 2005 6:28 pm
Ubicación: Cantabria/Canarias

Räder versus Wegener. Ni Mahaniano ni Tirpitziano...

Mensajepor V.Manstein » Mar Mar 21, 2006 1:21 am

Una controversia personal como la protagonizada por estos dos insignes marinos alemanes, que tiene tintes quasicinematográficos, puede y debe ser el punto de partida de un debate sobre lo que pudo ser y no fué la Kriegsmarine y su desarrollo estratégico entreguerras. Creo muy interesante el siguiente trabajo que les propongo sobre el problema. Se agradecen críticas y comentarios al respecto:


http://www.nwc.navy.mil/press/review/20 ... t5-a05.htm

Algunos fragmentos de interés en mi opinión:

has been suggested that Raeder's resentment of Wegener was due to personal jealousy and the obstruction that Wegener's theories represented to Raeder's plans for recreating between the wars a German world-power fleet (Weltmachtflotte). A number of naval historians have been critical of Raeder's leadership, supporting the general view that the German naval leadership was striving to recreate a "Tirpitzian" battle fleet. (5) Specifically, many prominent German historians have also criticized Raeder's leadership. Their collective assessment implies that interwar German naval leaders learned nothing from the experiences of the First World War and that they directed all of their energy toward preparing for another major fleet engagement against the Royal Navy. Raeder has been accused of attempting "to formulate strategy ... like his predecessor Tirpitz.... without weighing national goals, interests, threats, or strategies, seeing the fleet largely as an isolated entity, detached from grand strategic planning." (6) An American historian writing in 1940 felt that Raeder and his subordinates suffered from "an atrophy of strategic thought." (7)

Severe criticism has also extended to the capital acquisition plans and operational concepts employed by the Kriegsmarine during the Second World War. One of the most damaging such attacks accuses the Germans of having no coherent concept of operations: "The important decisions on warship construction were changed several times and were not based on a detailed, structurally well-thought-out plan." (8) In this view, the German admiralty had not "even a modicum of strategic sense in the handling of capital ships"; for instance, Bismarck should have been held in reserve until Tirpitz was operational, at which point these two battleships should have been used together with the battle cruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and an aircraft carrier. This "might have put an incalculable strain on British resources" and encouraged the Italian navy to more aggressive action. On this view, the Germans resigned themselves to their status as an inferior naval power and as a consequence "wasted their great ships singly as mere commerce raiders." (9)



The falling-out between Grand Admiral Raeder and Vice Admiral Wegener appears instead to have been ideologically based and directly related to Wegener's professional writing. As Raeder began to exceed Wegener in rank, he would use his position and influence openly to suppress the strategic theories of his classmate and to isolate his former friend. Wegener was promoted to rear admiral on 1 March 1923, serving as inspector of naval artillery. With only four vice admirals' positions, the competition for advancement was stiff, and Wegener was directed to retire in 1926 by Admiral Zenker, the naval chief. Raeder, eventually head of the German navy, would direct officers under his command to write articles discrediting Wegener's work. He would also endeavor, unsuccessfully, to stop the publication of Wegener's book The Naval Strategy of the World War (Die Seestrategie des Weltkrieges). (19) The importance of the point is not merely biographical; the differences between the two admirals' philosophies were emblematic of a fundamental divergence at the highest levels of German naval strategy development during the interwar era.

Wegener's book, which was published in 1929 and reissued in a second edition in 1941, was actually a compilation of three staff papers that he had written during 1915, while serving as a fleet staff officer in the rank of lieutenant commander. Indeed, since his earliest days in the navy, Wegener had demonstrated considerable literary and intellectual ability. Between 1902 and 1907, he wrote no less than seven noteworthy papers, most of which while on the staffs of the Naval Education Department and the Naval Academy. After three years of sea duty between 1908 and 1911, during which he served as a gunnery officer in the battleships Preussen and Kaiser Barbarrosa and finally in the heavy cruiser Blucher, Wegener's evident staff skills resulted in his promotion and posting as a fleet staff officer. His first assignment in this capacity was under Rear Admiral Gustav Bachmann as his Second Staff Officer, but his billet was quickly changed in 1912 to the First Staff Officer of the First Battle Squadron, commanded by Vice Admiral Wilhelm von Lans. The significance of this assignment should not be missed--the First Battle Squadron was one of the premier formations in the fleet, composed of eight powerful battleships of the Nassau and Helgoland classes. Wegener's abilities had landed him a high-visibility operational post under the direct supervision of a very senior flag officer.

By February 1915, when the first of Wegener's controversial papers was issued under the signature of Admiral Lans, the reality of the German naval situation was becoming apparent to most observers. The enormous cost of building, supplying, and crewing the fleet had been borne only grudgingly by both the German army and the public. (20) After the loss of Blucher at the Battle of the Dogger Bank (see map 1), Admiral Tirpitz and his Risk Theory (Risikogedanke) became the object of increasing criticism from many quarters. (21) The inactivity of the High Seas Fleet and the mounting effect of the British "hunger blockade" were having disquieting effects. Wegener's questions about the navy's employment came at a time when the German army was increasingly resentful that the navy had suffered relatively little when its own casualties were heavy; the German public, for its part, was generally skeptical about the navy's performance; and the service itself was suffering a crisis of confidence. When the first of Wegener's papers was circulated, Admiral Tirpitz became enraged. That it was possible for Wegener to write two further papers and release them under his own signature is truly remarkable, with regard not only to his junior position and Tirpitz's ire but to the obvious fracture it represented in the strategic thinking of the German naval officer corps. (22)

Collectively, Wegener's three papers argued that the strategic-defensive orientation of the Risk Theory was invalid, in that it did not threaten the principal British vulnerability, maritime trade. The complete dependence of British industry upon imported resources and the inability of agriculture to feed the nation had been well known long before the First World War. The obvious way to bring the imperial giant to its knees was to sever the maritime jugular: "In quintessentially Mahanian terms, the [Wegenerian] treatise stated that sea power consisted of control of maritime communications, particularly the protection of vital sea lanes." Writing in an abrupt and forceful style, highlighting conclusions in terse, one-sentence paragraphs, Wegener charged the wartime leadership with misunderstanding the fundamental uses of the sea. Moreover, he accused it of committing the fleet to battle in pursuit of tactical victories that, having no strategic consequence, were purposeless. Wegener combined classically Clausewitzian logic, which dictated that battle must be accepted only in support of a political aim, with an astute assessment of the German military situation and a clear appreciation of European geography. From all this he concluded, "Our defensive operations plan lacked an object of defense. Therefore, there was no battle for command of the sea in the North Sea. The Helgoland Bight was, is, and remains a dead angle in a dead sea." Wegener asserted that geographic position was just as vital as the possession of a fleet of ships and that such position should relate directly to the willingness of one's forces to engage the enemy: "The tactical will to battle is a correlate of geography." (23)



Having argued that the current strategy was ineffective, Wegener set out his own vision of how the British could be attacked effectively: "Naval strategy is the science of geographic position ... with regard to trade routes." He declared that the only British traffic vulnerable to German interference was the Norway--Shetland Islands--Scotland route through the North Sea. In order to attain a geographic position of strategic relevance with respect to British mercantile shipping, he argued, it was necessary to mount a "northward strategic-offensive operation" that would change the geographic setting. He proposed expansion through Denmark and southwestern Norway and then over to the Shetland Islands, "the Gate to the Atlantic." Wegener insisted that by positioning itself to threaten a trade route the German fleet could overcome the British disinclination to tactical engagement in favor of distant blockade. The British would then be obliged to commit to battle, during which "the compulsion that we would have exerted would have increased with our every success."


Plainly, Raeder had found something in the work to which he objected strongly. What was it? To understand, let us return to Wegener's thesis.

When Wegener's wartime papers first appeared, Tirpitz had assigned two senior captains to draft counterposition papers; these replies attacked the details of Wegener's work but did not "come to grips with its strategic insights." (38) Actually, Wegener's thesis had enough inconsistencies of detail and contradictions in terms to be vulnerable on the level of technicalities alone. Despite the accuracy of the basic geostrategic assessment and the remarkable clarity of Wegener's style, many reversals of position are apparent both within and between the three papers. Ever meticulous, Raeder would certainly have latched onto these glaring weaknesses and on that basis questioned the entire work.

As an example, immediately after his statement (which became famous) belittling the Helgoland Bight battle as a fight for "a dead angle," Wegener declares, "And yet, we once did exercise command of the sea from the Helgoland Bight--namely, with the U-boats, which even at great distances from their base have the ability to exert lasting pressure upon enemy trade routes." (39) In this short sentence Wegener betrayed a misunderstanding of the term "command of the sea" and so undercut his thesis that fleets require favorable geographic position to effect such command. U-boats were in fact instruments of sea denial and trade interdiction, not sea control. The distant blockade of German ports by the Royal Navy was never broken by the German submarine offensive; British command of the sea, though challenged, remained intact. In another place, Wegener effectively countered his own "Gate to the Atlantic" thesis by openly doubting that the British would really contest a challenge in the Shetland Islands and suggesting they would likely relocate the trade route. (40)

Further, Wegener, having clearly identified the importance of British maritime commerce, failed to recognize that the converse was also true. That is, the Baltic was vital to the Germans during the First World War for the shipment of strategic materials and commercial goods. Again, Wegener in one place complains bitterly, "Our defensive operations plan lacked an objective of defense" and that "the position of the Helgoland Bight commanded nothing." Very soon afterward he contradicts himself: "Imagine that our fleet had been totally defeated [there]; what consequences this would soon have entailed for our economic and military situation. We could not have maintained our east and west front with an indented or even strongly threatened northern front." (41) In such passages his appreciation of the German position seems as weak as his assessment of Britain's position is accurate.

The greatest weakness in Wegener's proposal for an offensive campaign in the North Sea is his complete failure to suggest how it could be accomplished. Knowing full well the Risikogedanke assumption that an attacking force needed a one-third superiority, he does not even hint how an inferior German force could seize the Shetland Islands. (42) Helmuth Heye, at the time a Plans Division staff officer, was later to write that the Washington Conference tended to keep small fleets inferior despite technological innovation; accordingly, Heye felt, qualitative differences could never make up for inferiority in numbers. (43)

Wegener's writing never addressed this major issue. His theoretical foundation made set-piece battle the object of his proposal for aggressive action, although as a gunnery officer of considerable experience he should have been well aware of the overwhelming disadvantage under which his own inferior fleet would labor; (44) Wegener himself complained bitterly of the attitude of inferiority that their smaller ships and guns inculcated among German crews. (45) Once again, Mahan's "big-ship mentality" and emphasis on concentration of force for decisive engagements is clearly evident in his thesis. (46) Wegener, like Mahan (and despite his geopolitical orientation), ignored the economic realities of his theories. (47) German naval force structure was dictated by systemic factors; Germany simply did not possess the resources necessary to produce the naval capability Wegener's vision seemed to require
.

On what theoretical basis could such a role be based? The Tirpitzian dream of a Weltmachtflotte was now neither politically nor economically feasible, and a fleet based on cruisers and submarines and designed for Kleinkreig had been prohibited by the Treaty of Versailles. Another approach to maritime strategy would be required. Raeder found it in the writings of a recognized and respected naval theorist, one who specialized in middle-power navies--Vice Admiral Raoul Castex of France. (59)

Castex and the "Middle Ground." The theories of Castex, which were developed during the interwar period, were ideally suited to the German position as an inferior continental naval power. Castex, like Raeder, had "had to conceive a naval strategy by which a land power might deal with British naval superiority." (60) The key was to find a middle-ground strategy, between the fleet-action theory of Mahan and the Jeune Ecole theory of Theophile Aube, which employed operational maneuver to create favorable tactical situations. (61) Castex believed that it was not necessary to seek a Mahanian fleet action, rather that a limited tactical victory in a critical situation could "upset the balance" and win opportunities for maneuver. The benefits of winning even secondary objectives in secondary theaters "may exceed expectations and bring a success having major repercussions upon the principal theater, where all remains in doubt, even though the plan of maneuver has foreseen exactly the opposite." (62) On this basis Raeder envisioned a useful role for the navy that the German government might be persuaded to accept. German defensive requirements for seapower had to be balanced against the undeniable need to go on the offensive against Great Britain. To resolve this seeming conundrum, as will be seen, Raeder would resort to an innovation not seen before in naval history.

Breadth and Scope. If Wegener focused almost exclusively on the North Sea, Raeder had an expansive view of naval warfare and the area over which it should be conducted. His conception of seapower was in fact global:

All naval theatres of war formed a homogenous whole and that
consequently any operation must be viewed in its correlation with
other sea areas. Accordingly, cruiser warfare overseas and
operations by the battle fleet in home waters were integral
components of a single naval strategy which, by exploiting the
diversionary effect, sought to weaken the enemy's forces and to
disrupt supplies. (63)
That is, Raeder envisioned improving the odds locally through actions half the world away--an impressive grasp of the potential for the long reach of seapower. Raeder's frame of reference dwarfed Wegener's; this frame of reference underlay a chain of reasoning by which Raeder attempted to answer the fundamental question of how an inferior naval power could engage a superior opponent, something Wegener had not been able to do.

Range and Endurance. An active approach is necessary if maneuver opportunities are to be generated; the strategic-defensive of the Tirpitzian Risikogedanke could not produce them. Further, the geographical restrictions that Wegener perceived in the Great War and 1920s persisted in the 1930s; maneuver would require sea room and the endurance to exploit it. For Germany, then, endurance was a fundamentally limiting factor on the effectiveness of fleet forces. From the moment Raeder assumed command of the German navy, high endurance became a design goal for new Kriegsmarine warships.


The fundamental differences in naval strategy between Admirals Raeder and Wegener corresponded, then, from their different perspectives from which they looked at the problem. Raeder was bound by national strategy, policy, and government economic and budgetary priorities. Wegener's theories were limited by no such realities. Wegener steadfastly held to his notion that Great Britain and its domination over the world's oceans stood in the way of German national greatness. In fact, however, as we have seen, German foreign and defense policy during the Weimar and, at least initially, National Socialist regimes was oriented not against Britain but against the threat of a combined Polish and French invasion. Naval issues were secondary, and Raeder had his minister's instructions: "Base [naval] operational ideas more on political and military [i.e., land] realities." (101) The new and flexible approach to seapower strategy, warship design, and operational concepts that resulted would have been anathema to naval leaders of the Tirpitz era.

While Raeder repeatedly sought and received assurances from Hitler that war against Great Britain was not part of the grand plan, Wegener could see no other outcome. He had declared in his 1929 book, "As long as England acts as an outpost of America, no European world can be established;" (102) unrestrained by practicalities, he continued to press his theories, and in so doing distanced himself from his former crewmate and friend. Ultimately, Wegener's views left him alone and bitter; if his operational doctrines were now unrealistic, he had accurately foreseen the future enemy, and soon he saw his country engaged in the war that he had always maintained was unavoidable.
Soldat im 20.Jahrhundert
ImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagen

Avatar de Usuario
José Luis
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 8922
Registrado: Sab Jun 11, 2005 3:06 am
Ubicación: España

Mensajepor José Luis » Mar Mar 21, 2006 3:47 am

¡Hola, mon ami!

Ya comenté parte de ese ensayo, directa o indirectamente, en:

http://wwwsegundaguerr.superforos.com/v ... php?t=1140
http://wwwsegundaguerr.superforos.com/v ... php?t=1249

Un ensayo digno de leer con mucha calma.

Saludos cordiales
José Luis
"Dioses, no me juzguéis como un dios
sino como un hombre
a quien ha destrozado el mar" (Plegaria fenicia)

Avatar de Usuario
minoru genda
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 3342
Registrado: Vie Jun 24, 2005 11:25 pm
Contactar:

Mensajepor minoru genda » Mar Mar 21, 2006 10:32 pm

PUFFFFFF... Lo siento, pero además de que me desborda el curro internaútico soy de un perezoso para los idiomas que no sean el mio que te cagas :x la verdad cuando me ponen post largos aunque los leo llega un momento que casi como que me canso, lo que pasa es que si uno quiere aprender y controlar un poco (y eso es lo que se trata aprender y controlar) no queda otra que leerlos. Por tanto no os podeís imaginar cuando me ponen algo en otro idioma, es que llega la quinta línea y lo casi mando al peo :lol: y si añadimos que en inglés solo me defiendo y solo cuando un tema me interesa pos ya está el lio armao :lol: :lol: .
No hay ningún viento favorable para quien no sabe a que puerto se dirige.
Schopenhauer
U-historia.com

Avatar de Usuario
V.Manstein
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 774
Registrado: Lun Jun 13, 2005 6:28 pm
Ubicación: Cantabria/Canarias

Mensajepor V.Manstein » Mié Mar 22, 2006 3:05 am

¡Vamos, señores!, si es un ensayito. Minoru, haga el esfuerzo, le va a gustar y seguro que tendrá algo que comentar.
Soldat im 20.Jahrhundert

ImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagen

Avatar de Usuario
minoru genda
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 3342
Registrado: Vie Jun 24, 2005 11:25 pm
Contactar:

Mensajepor minoru genda » Mié Mar 22, 2006 10:19 pm

Primero si no te importa Manstein te voy a tutear y desearía que hicieras lo mismo :wink:
Segundo no pongo en duda que me gustará pero eso lo veré cuando tenga ganas y la verdad viendo lo largo del "ensayito" me temo que va a tardar en entrarme esa gana :lol: perdona que sea un pelín vago, pa eso de traducir cosas largas y es que además tengo un tema que me interesa mucho más sobre el Hood en inglés y por no liarme a traducirlo de momento paso :lol: :lol: :lol: y lo terdero es que si de verdad me gustara tanto hablar inglés y traducirlo estaría o pasaría mucho tiempo perdido por internete :lol: :lol: :lol: en otros sitios :wink:
Mi objetivo y deseo es desde hace tiempo ir aprendiendo por mi mismo y/o con ayuda de otros, todo lo más posible y ayudar a otros a lo mismo, pero a ser posible en la lengua más bella del planeta, el castellano :wink:
Pero tranquilo que si te es tan importante mi opinión :wink: procuraré descansar lo más pronto posible :wink: :D
No hay ningún viento favorable para quien no sabe a que puerto se dirige.
Schopenhauer
U-historia.com

Avatar de Usuario
beltzo
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 1343
Registrado: Jue Sep 29, 2005 8:49 am

Mensajepor beltzo » Mié Mar 22, 2006 11:43 pm

Hola a todos:

¡Vamos, señores!, si es un ensayito

Un ensayito que a algunos nos lleva mucho tiempo para leer y aun más para comprender :roll: . Por ello y para animar a su lectura pongo aquí el primer trozo del "ensayito" tal y como yo lo he traducido (o entendido):

Ha sido indicado que el resentimiento de Raeder hacía Wegener era atribuible a los celos personales y al obstáculo que las teorías de Wegener representaban a los planes de Raeder para recrear una flota alemana (Weltmachtflotte) de potencia mundial en el periodo entre guerras. Varios historiadores navales han sido críticos con el liderazgo de Raeder, manteniendo el punto de vista de que las directivas navales alemanas fueron una lucha por recrear una flota de guerra de tipo "Tirpitziana". (5) Concretamente, muchos historiadores alemanes ilustres también han criticado el liderazgo de Raeder. La valoración de este colectivo alude que en el periodo entre guerras los jefes navales alemanes no aprendieron nada de las experiencias de la Primera Guerra Mundial y que dirigieron toda su energía hacia la preparación para otro gran enfrentamiento de la flota con la RN. Raeder ha sido acusado de intentar "Formular la estrategia.... como su predecesor Tirpitz.... Sin sopesar los objetivos nacionales, intereses, amenazas, o estrategias, viendo la flota en gran parte como una entidad aislada, se desconectaron de un gran plan estratégico." (6) Un historiador estadounidense que escribía en 1940 sentía que Raeder y sus subordinados sufrían de "Una atrofia del concepto estratégico." (7)

Las graves críticas también se han extendido a los planes de adquisición de capital y los conceptos de operacionales empleados por la Kriegsmarine durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Uno de los ataques más dañinos acusa a los alemanes de no tener ningún concepto coherente de las operaciones: "Las decisiones importantes sobre la construcción de buques de guerra fueron cambiadas varias veces y no estaban basadas en un plan detallado y estructuralmente bien planeado." En este punto de vista, el almirantazgo alemán no tenía "una mínima cantidad de juicio estratégico en el manejo de buques importantes"; por ejemplo, el Bismarck debería haber estado en reserva hasta que el Tirpitz fuera operacional, momento en el que ambos acorazados deberían haber sido usados junto con los cruceros Scharnhorst y Gneisenau y un portaaviones. Esto "Podría haber supuesto una tensión incalculable sobre los recursos británicos" y dar alas a la marina italiana para movimientos más agresivos. En este punto de vista, los alemanes se resignaron ellos mismos a su estado como una potencia naval inferior y como consecuencia "malgastaron sus grandes buques individualmente como simples corsarios."


Saludos
ImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagen

"Si mi teoría de la relatividad es exacta, los alemanes dirán que soy alemán y los franceses que soy ciudadano del mundo. Pero sino, los franceses dirán que soy alemán, y los alemanes que soy judío". Albert Einstein

Avatar de Usuario
V.Manstein
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 774
Registrado: Lun Jun 13, 2005 6:28 pm
Ubicación: Cantabria/Canarias

Mensajepor V.Manstein » Jue Mar 23, 2006 5:52 am

Gracias , amigo Minoru por tu buena disposición y humor. Gracias Beltzo por su amable contribución; en esos primeros párrafos que ha traducido hay alguna hipótesis perfectamente debatible:
........... En este punto de vista, el almirantazgo alemán no tenía "una mínima cantidad de juicio estratégico en el manejo de buques importantes"; por ejemplo, el Bismarck debería haber estado en reserva hasta que el Tirpitz fuera operacional, momento en el que ambos acorazados deberían haber sido usados junto con los cruceros Scharnhorst y Gneisenau y un portaaviones. Esto "Podría haber supuesto una tensión incalculable sobre los recursos británicos" y dar alas a la marina italiana para movimientos más agresivos. En este punto de vista, los alemanes se resignaron ellos mismos a su estado como una potencia naval inferior y como consecuencia "malgastaron sus grandes buques individualmente como simples corsarios.".......
Soldat im 20.Jahrhundert

ImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagen

Avatar de Usuario
beltzo
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 1343
Registrado: Jue Sep 29, 2005 8:49 am

Mensajepor beltzo » Jue Mar 23, 2006 9:10 am

Hola de nuevo:

Estoy de acuerdo en parte con las apreciaciones que se hacen, el Bismarck nunca debió salir de la manera que lo hizo, fue un despilfarro enorme, lo mandaron directamente de la botadura al desguace. Se ve que los nazis tenían prisa por ganar la guerra. Lo que no tengo tan claro es que ello fuera responsabilidad única de la Kriegsmarine y si esperaban a tener un portaaviones creo que iban a tener que esperar mucho tiempo, pero por lo menos podían haber esperado al tirpitz y enviado al Scharnhorst y el Gneisenau en su compañía con un par de destructores.

La marina italiana para mostrarse más agresiva necesitaba tener algún portaaviones o cuando menos buques dotados de radar, vamos que lo que hicieran los alemanes con su flota no creo que iba ser muy relevante para los italianos.

Saludos
ImagenImagenImagenImagenImagenImagen



"Si mi teoría de la relatividad es exacta, los alemanes dirán que soy alemán y los franceses que soy ciudadano del mundo. Pero sino, los franceses dirán que soy alemán, y los alemanes que soy judío". Albert Einstein

Avatar de Usuario
minoru genda
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 3342
Registrado: Vie Jun 24, 2005 11:25 pm
Contactar:

Mensajepor minoru genda » Jue Mar 23, 2006 10:46 pm

Bien sabemos que Reihnnubung fué un grave error pero no lo fue menos el hecho de desaprovechar las unidades de superficie del modo que se hizo.
Hay algo en lo que estoy de acuerdo con compañeros de éste y otros foros hubiera resultado más económico y más sencillo construir dos o tres cruceros acorazados tipo Deuschland o bien cuatro o cinco cruceros ligeros si lo que se pretendía era atacar al tráfico marítimo, usar al Bismarck para ese cometido hubiera sido un despilfarro, digo hubiera porque la acción se quedó en grado de tentativa por los hechos que todos conocemos.
El asunto está que los planes de modernización e incremento de la Kriegsmarine se fue al garete por la prematura entrada en guerra, creo que en su desarrollo el plan Z estaba bien concebido para una actuación a largo plazo como la que estaba planificada, si además tenemos en cuenta que Raeder presento a Hitler un plan alternativo que hubiera sido mejor, tal y como se desarrollaron los acontecimientos, podemos decir que fue Hitler el que se equivocó y no sus subordinados.
No hay ningún viento favorable para quien no sabe a que puerto se dirige.
Schopenhauer
U-historia.com

Avatar de Usuario
Salgento Arensivia
Miembro
Miembro
Mensajes: 327
Registrado: Mar Mar 14, 2006 5:56 am

Mensajepor Salgento Arensivia » Vie Mar 24, 2006 12:54 am

El comienzo de la guerra sorprendió a la Armada alemana en plena modernización, pero muy muy lejos de haberla completado. Una flota de grandes buques no se consigue de la noche a la mañana. Así tenemos una flota pequeña de buques modernos enfrentándose a una flota enorme de buques más antiguos. Cuando se da una situación así, solo hay dos maneras de actuar:
-La guerra de corso, análoga a la guerra de guerrillas que emplean los ejércitos cuando están en franca inferioridad.
-La "amenaza en potencia".
Cada opción tiene sus ventajas e inconvenientes. Para una guerra de corso es suficiente con unidades de tamaño pequeño o mediano, parece que en este sentido los alemanes despilfarraron algunos de sus grandes buques, pero los cruceros ligeros y destructores alemanes no tenían radio de acción suficiente (ya que no tenían bases intermedias) para operar en un conflicto que era a escala mundial (los buques corsarios y submarinos tenían otras características). Hubiera sido muy sencillo para los ingleses cazar los pequeños buques alemanes, limitados al Atlántico Norte.
En cuanto a la amenaza en potencia, es exactamente lo que se hizo con el Tirpitz y el Scharnhorst. Esta táctica consiste en tener inmovilizadas una serie de unidades enemigas para impedir que puedan actuar tus unidades (aunque no las vayas a usar)
Al final, ninguna táctica dio resultado. Casi todos los grandes buques alemanes fueron hundidos. El Bismark intentó hacer guerra de corso y fue hundido. El Tirpitz fue amenaza en potencia y acabó igual que el Bismark.
Pienso que un portaaviones (e incluso dos) no hubieran sido una gran diferencia. A los buques hay que abastecerlos. Cuanto más grande el número de barcos que saques del puerto, más suministros necesitarán y menos lejos irán, con lo que serán más fáciles de localizar y hundir por una flota mucho, pero que mucho más numerosa. Hacer planes está muy bien , pero cuando llega el momento hay que combatir con lo que se tiene a mano

Avatar de Usuario
Harry Flashman
Miembro
Miembro
Mensajes: 151
Registrado: Mié Abr 05, 2006 8:29 pm
Ubicación: España

Mensajepor Harry Flashman » Jue Abr 06, 2006 7:58 pm

No sé de donde iban a sacar los alemanes una flota de gran tamaño. Durante los años treinta la marina tenía que competir con el ejército y la Luftwaffe por unos recursos limitados, y la construcción de barcos de guerra es muy cara y consume muchísimos recursos, sobre todo acero. La flota en 1.939 era un embrión de lo que se suponía que debía haber sido, y no se planificó para combatir en esa fecha, sino en 1.948, de manera que decir que se debían haber construido barcos más ligeros para operaciones de corso es ignorar los planes del almirantazgo alemán en cuanto a la expansión y el tamaño final de la flota; lo único que se les puede reprochar en ese sentido es haber usado conceptos anticuados en la construcción de los barcos, demasiado apegados al estilo de la Primera Guerra Mundial, dotándolos de poca artillería antiaérea y una autonomía escasa, propia de una guerra en el Mar del Norte, no en el Atlántico central y meridional.
En cuanto a los portaaviones, ¿alguno se ha molestado en echar un vistazo a los aviones que los alemanes pensaban embarcar?. Oscilaban entre aviones tan inadecuados para operar desde un portaaviones como el Bf 109, con su tren de aterrizaje estrecho, a antiguallas como el bombardero en picado Arado que ganó el concurso convocado, lento y de cabina abierta. La verdad es que eran tan pobres para un portaaviones como lo fueron los aviones británicos durante toda la guerra, nada que ver con los aviones americanos y japoneses, mucho más modernos y pensados para el mar, no meras adaptaciones de aviones basados en tierra (como el Seafire o el Sea Hurricane)y diseños que en el ámbito terrestre no se hubieran molestado ni en mirar (como el Skua o el Fulmar :lol: ). Por ello los portaaviones alemanes hubieran sido unos barcos bastante poco eficaces; además, ¿quién los hubiera escoltado?.
Respecto a la "amenaza potencial" que suponían los barcos alemanes, se quedó casi siempre en eso, ya que raramente salían a combatir, salvo en el Báltico, y cuando lo hicieron la suerte fue desigual. Yo la explico más bien por la falta de agresividad de la Royal Navy, quizá por un "complejo de Jutlandia" que les llevaba a no arriesgar la flota , aún dispondiendo de una superioridad aplastante. Se perdieron incluso oportunidades claras de infligir una derrota total a los alemanes, como cuando el Scharnhorst, el Gneisenau y el Prinz Eugen navegaron atravesando el Canal de la Mancha en 1.942 desde la costa francesa a los puertos alemanes; tan sólo algunos aviones, destructores y torpederas intentaron detenerles, y los únicos daños que sufrieron fueron debidos al choque con minas (que fueron bastante graves, ya que los cruceros de batalla estuvieron bastante tiempo en el dique seco). Ni siquiera un mísero crucero fué a su encuentro.

Avatar de Usuario
Calígula
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 666
Registrado: Jue Jul 14, 2005 11:25 pm
Ubicación: No se dice este país, sino ESPAÑA

Mensajepor Calígula » Jue Abr 06, 2006 10:39 pm

Harry Flashman escribió:Ni siquiera un mísero crucero fué a su encuentro

Si no se envio ningun navio pesado de la Royal Navy al canal de la mancha, fue por lo mismo que fueron obligados a levar anclas de Brest los buques alemanes. A parte de la insistencia de Hitler para defender una hipotetica invasion en Noruega, fueron evacuados de Brest, por los continuos castigos de la RAF que ya llevaba 12.000t de bombas arrojadas sobre los tres navios mientras estaban en puerto frances. No habia pasada de los ingleses, que no hiciera un nuevo daño a los cruceros. En el canal de la Mancha, las grandes unidades navales inglesas, estaban impedidas de operar, pues estaban a tiro de la Luftwaffe apostada en Francia y Holanda.
ImagenImagenImagenImagen
Heinrich Heine Allí donde se queman los libros, se terminaran quemando personas

Avatar de Usuario
Harry Flashman
Miembro
Miembro
Mensajes: 151
Registrado: Mié Abr 05, 2006 8:29 pm
Ubicación: España

Mensajepor Harry Flashman » Vie Abr 07, 2006 4:48 pm

Calígula escribió:
Harry Flashman escribió:Ni siquiera un mísero crucero fué a su encuentro

Si no se envio ningun navio pesado de la Royal Navy al canal de la mancha, fue por lo mismo que fueron obligados a levar anclas de Brest los buques alemanes. A parte de la insistencia de Hitler para defender una hipotetica invasion en Noruega, fueron evacuados de Brest, por los continuos castigos de la RAF que ya llevaba 12.000t de bombas arrojadas sobre los tres navios mientras estaban en puerto frances. No habia pasada de los ingleses, que no hiciera un nuevo daño a los cruceros. En el canal de la Mancha, las grandes unidades navales inglesas, estaban impedidas de operar, pues estaban a tiro de la Luftwaffe apostada en Francia y Holanda.

A eso me refería con la pasividad y falta de agresividad de la Royal Navy, no fueron capaces de arriesgar sus grandes unidades en ningún momento. Desde luego que la Luftwaffe tenía superioridad aérea sobre el Canal en esos momentos, pero tenía una capacidad antibuque limitada, menor que la de la RAF, que no había sido capaz de destruir los tres barcos alemanes pese a sus incesantes ataques aéreos sobre ellos. La enorme desproporción numérica de los británicos sobre los alemanes nunca se aprovechó. Arriesgando un poco más hubieran conseguido destruir rápidamente la pequeña flota alemana, quizá a cambio de aumentar sus pérdidas, pero a largo plazo hubiera liberado gran cantidad de barcos de la tarea de permanecer vigilantes frente a las salidas de los barcos alemanes, haciendo con ellos otra cosa que permanecer en reserva en los puertos británicos y patrullar por el Mar del Norte.

Avatar de Usuario
Eriol
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 8656
Registrado: Dom Ago 17, 2008 10:51 pm
Ubicación: Ciudad Real

Re: Räder versus Wegener. Ni Mahaniano ni Tirpitziano...

Mensajepor Eriol » Vie Oct 26, 2012 12:02 am

Hola!!

Aprovecho para poner aqui una pregunta por no abrir otro tema referente a la obra de Wegener Estrategia Naval En La Guerra Mundial

Tengo entendido que fue traducida por la armada argentina en 1950:

http://articulo.mercadolibre.cl/MLC-405 ... egener-_JM

¿Alguien tiene este libro o sabe como conseguirlo?

Saludos
Una vision; un propósito;un sueño...Siempre.

dzugavili
Miembro
Miembro
Mensajes: 251
Registrado: Jue Feb 17, 2011 3:15 pm

Re: Räder versus Wegener. Ni Mahaniano ni Tirpitziano...

Mensajepor dzugavili » Vie Oct 26, 2012 9:12 pm

Hola.
A partir del 31 de julio de 1940,cuando Hitler comunica a los altos mandos de la Wermacht,incluyendo Raeder, la decisión de atacar a la URSS,la única estrategia sensata para la Kriegsmarine,dado su potencial y al enemigo al que se enfrentaba,y más con la entrada en guerra de Estados Unidos,era concentrar todos sus grupos navales;Bismarck-Tirpitz,Scharnhorst-Gneisenau,Lutzow-Scheer,Hipper-Prinz Eugen,con todos los cruceros ligeros y destructores no indispensables en otros sectores,en el mar Ártico.Con cobertura de aviación basada en tierra era posible taponar Murmansk,algo más difícil la ruta de Arkhangelsk,aunque ésta sólo es practicable con el buen tiempo.
Conseguir el dominio naval regional y cerrar el acceso a la URSS por la ruta directa para posibles,como realmente sucedió,abastecimientos por parte de sus aliados.
Estrategia sensata,dados los recursos de los que disponía,con posibilidades reales de lograrse y que,sin ser de un efecto decisivo,hubiera aliviado la posición del Heer en la decisiva liza que sostenía en el este.
Saludos.


Volver a “Doctrina militar”

¿Quién está conectado?

Usuarios navegando por este Foro: No hay usuarios registrados visitando el Foro y 2 invitados