pub01.jpg

El harakiri político-militar japonés

La guerra en el Pacífico

Moderador: José Luis

Schwerpunkt
Moderador
Moderador
Mensajes: 1499
Registrado: Mar Oct 21, 2008 9:08 pm

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Schwerpunkt » Mié Oct 22, 2008 11:54 pm

En la actualidad sería difícil de comprender lo que supuso la decisión de entrar en guerra contra EE.UU. y que supuso en la práctica el suicidio del Imperio Japonés.

En realidad el Japón no tenía la menor posibilidad no ya de ganar la guerra sino tan siquiera de quedar en tablas y llegar a una paz negociada con los Estados Unidos –y con el Imperio Británico al que también y de paso le declararon la guerra- Un pequeño país por muy agresivo y entrenado para la guerra que estuviera y aunque tuviera una flota excelente sobredimensionada no podía tener la menor esperanza de ganar. Al bombardear Pearl Harbour el gobierno nipón se hizo el harakiri por adelantado…

Os recomiendo que echéis un vistazo al siguiente link que explica de forma muy gráfica “Porqué el Japón perdió la guerra”


http://www.combinedfleet.com/economic.htm


Cito textualmente. Si alguien tiene problemas para entender el texto original decídmelo y enviaré una traducción: Pido compresión con las tablas cuyas cifras estarán difíciles de seguir hasta que logre dominar el editor de texto. :)

“It's no secret that Japan was, shall we say, 'economically disadvantaged' in her ability to wage war against the Allies. However, the sheer, stunning magnitude of this economic disparity has never ceased to amaze me. So, just go give you an idea of the magnitude of the mismatch here, I decided to compile a few statistics. Most of them are taken from Paul Kennedy's "The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers" (which, among other things, contains an excellent analysis of the economic forces at work in World War II, and is an all-around great book) and John Ellis' "World War II: A Statistical Survey." In this comparison I will focus primarily on the two chief antagonists in the Pacific War: Japan and the United States. They say that economics is the 'Dismal Science'; you're about to see why....

Overview
By the time World War II began to rear it's ugly head (formally in 1939 in Poland, informally in China in 1937), America had been in the grips of the Great Depression for a decade, give or take. The net effect of the Depression was to introduce a lot of 'slack' into the U.S. economy. Many U.S. workers were either unemployed (10 million in 1939) or underemployed, and our industrial base as a whole had far more capacity than was needed at the time. In economic terms, our 'Capacity Utilization' (CapU), was pretty darn low. To an outside culture, particularly a militaristic one such as Japan's, America certainly might have appeared to be 'soft' and unprepared for a major war. Further, Japan's successes in fighting far larger opponents (Russia in the early 1900's, and China in the 1930's) and the fact that Japan's own economy was practically 'superheating' (mostly as the result of unhealthy levels of military spending -- 28% of national income in 1937) probably filled the Japanese with a misplaced sense of economic and military superiority over their large overseas foe. However, a dispassionate observer would also note a few important facts. America, even in the midst of seemingly interminable economic doldrums, still had:

Nearly twice the population of Japan.
Seventeen time's Japan's national income.
Five times more steel production.
Seven times more coal production.
Eighty (80) times the automobile production.

Furthermore, America had some hidden advantages that didn't show up directly in production figures. For one, U.S. factories were, on average, more modern and automated than those in Europe or in Japan. Additionally, American managerial practice at that time was the best in the world. Taken in combination, the per capita productivity of the American worker was the highest in the world. Furthermore, the United States was more than willing to utilize American women in the war effort: a tremendous advantage for us, and a concept which the Axis Powers seem not to have grasped until very late in the conflict. The net effect of all these factors meant that even in the depths of the Depression, American war-making potential was still around seven times larger than Japan's, and had the 'slack' been taken out in 1939, it was closer to nine or ten times as great! In fact, accroding to Kennedy, a breakdown of total global warmaking potential in 1937 looks something like this:
Furthermore, America had some hidden advantages that didn't show up directly in production figures. For one, U.S. factories were, on average, more modern and automated than those in Europe or in Japan. Additionally, American managerial practice at that time was the best in the world. Taken in combination, the per capita productivity of the American worker was the highest in the world. Furthermore, the United States was more than willing to utilize American women in the war effort: a tremendous advantage for us, and a concept which the Axis Powers seem not to have grasped until very late in the conflict. The net effect of all these factors meant that even in the depths of the Depression, American war-making potential was still around seven times larger than Japan's, and had the 'slack' been taken out in 1939, it was closer to nine or ten times as great! In fact, accroding to Kennedy, a breakdown of total global warmaking potential in 1937 looks something like this:

Country % of Total Warmaking Potential
United States 41.7%
Germany 14.4%
USSR 14.0%
UK 10.2%
France 4.2%
Japan 3.5%
Italy 2.5%
Seven Powers (total)(90.5%)

When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941, the sleeping giant was awakened and came looking for trouble. And even though the majority of America's war-making potential was slated for use against Germany (which was by far the most dangerous of the Axis foes, again for reasons of economics), there was still plenty left over for use against Japan. By mid-1942, even before U.S. force of arms was being dramatically felt globally, American factories were nevertheless beginning to make a material effect in the war's progress. The U.S. churned out seemingly endless quantities of equipment and provision which were then funnelled to not only our own forces, but to those of Great Britain and the USSR as well. By 1944, most of the other powers in the war, though still producing furiously, were beginning to max out their economies (i.e. production was stabilizing or plateauing). This resulted from destruction of industrial bases and constriction of resource pools (in the case of Germany and Japan), or through sheer exhaustion of manpower (in the case of Great Britain and, to an extent, the USSR). By contrast, the United States suffered from none of these difficulties, and as a consequence its economy grew at an annual rate of 15% throughout the war years. As scary as it sounds, by the end of the war, the United States was really just beginning to get 'warmed up.' It is perhaps not surprising that in 1945, the U.S. accounted for over 50% of total global GNP.

War Production
What, then, were the concrete outputs, in terms of 'beans and bullets', of the two competing industrial bases? I have presented some statistics on this matter in the following tables. I start with naval vessels, because they were a very important index of power in the Pacific War.
Warship Production
United States CV/CVL/CVE BB CA/CL DD Escorts Subs Japan CV/CVL/CVE BB CA/CL DD Escorts Subs
1941 - 2 1 2 - 2 1941 6 1 - - ? -
1942 18 4 8 82 - 34 1942 4 1 4 10 ? 61
1943 65 2 11 128 298 55 1943 2 - 3 12 ? 37
1944 45 2 14 74 194 81 1944 5 - 2 24 ? 39
1945 13 - 14 63 6 31 1945 - - - 17 ? 30
Total 141 10 48 349 498 203 Total 17 2 9 63 ? 167

[Key: CV/CVL/CVE = Aircraft Carriers of all kinds; BB = Battleship; CA/CL= Heavy Cruiser, Light Cruiser; DD =Destroyer; Escorts = Destroyer escorts, frigates, sloops and corvettes]

A couple of points need to made here. First, the majority of the carriers listed in the U.S. totals were 'Jeep' carriers, CVEs carrying a couple dozen aircraft and suitable mostly for escort duties rather than front-line combat (which didn't subtract a whit from their effectiveness as antisubmarine or ground-support platforms). But it should also be noted that the American CVs on average operated substantially larger air wings than their Japanese counterparts (80-90 vs. 60-70 aircraft). The net result; by 1944, when Task Force 38 or 58 (depending on whether Halsey or Spruance was in charge of the main American carrier force at the moment) came to play, they could be counted upon to bring nearly a thousand combat aircraft with them. That kind of power projection capability was crucial to winning the war -- we could literally bring more aircraft to the party than any island air base could put up in its own defense, as the neutralization of both Truk and the Marshall Islands attests.
The other important figure here is the DD/Escort totals. Japan, an island empire totally dependent on maintaining open sea lanes to ensure her raw material imports, managed to build just sixty-three DDs (some twenty or so of which would have been classified by the Allies as DEs) and an unspecified (and by my unofficial count, relatively small) number of 'escort' vessels. In the same time span, the US put some eight hundred forty-seven antisubmarine capable craft in the water! And that total doesn't even cover the little stuff like the armed yachts and subchasers we used off our Eastern seaboard against the German U-Boats. All in all, by the end of the war, American naval power was unprecedented. In fact, by 1945 the U.S. Navy was larger than every other navy in the world, combined!

The Pacific War was also very much a war of merchant shipping, in that practically everything needed to defend and/or assault the various island outposts of the Japanese Empire had to be transported across vast stretches of ocean. Japan also had to maintain her vital supply lanes to places like Borneo and Java in order to keep her industrial base supplied. A look at the relative shipbuilding output of the two antagonists is enlightening.

Merchant Ship Production (in tons)
Year United States Japan
1939 376,419 320,466
1940 528,697 293,612
1941 1,031,974 210,373
1942 5,479,766 260,059
1943 11,448,360 769,085
1944 9,288,156 1,699,203
1945 5,839,858 599,563
Total 33,993,230 4,152,361

Every time I look at these number, I just shake my head in amazement. The United States built more merchant shipping in the first four and a half months of 1943 than Japan put in the water in seven years. The other really interesting thing is that there was really no noticeable increase in Japanese merchant vessel building until 1943, by which time it was already way too late to stop the bleeding. Just as with their escort building programs, the Japanese were operating under a tragically flawed national strategy that dictated that the war with the United States would be a short one. Again, the United States had to devote a lot of the merchant shipping it built to replace the losses inflicted by the German U-Boats. But it is no joke to say that we were literally building ships faster than anybody could sink them, and still have enough left over to carry mountains of material to the most God-forsaken, desolate stretches of the Pacific. Those Polynesian cargo cults didn't start for no reason, and it was American merchant vessels in their thousands which delivered the majority of this seemingly divinely profligate largesse to backwaters which had probably never seen so much as a can opener before.
Finally, no examination of the Pacific War would be complete without taking a look at air power. For all the talk of the Pacific War being a 'Carrier War', an aircraft carrier is really nothing more than a vehicle to deliver an airplane to an area of operations. While airplanes certainly couldn't take and hold islands by themselves, air supremacy was vital in ensuring that such bastions could be reduced and captured. Below is a table depicting the aircraft production of the two antagonists.

Aircraft Production
Year United States Japan
1939 5,856 4,467
1940 12,804 4,768
1941 26,277 5,088
1942 47,836 8,861
1943 85,898 16,693
1944 96,318 28,180
1945 49,761 8,263
Total 324,750 76,320

Again, a pretty staggering difference. Not only that, but as Paul Kennedy points out, the Allies were not only cranking out more planes, but many of them were of newer design as well, such as the new F4U Corsair and F6F Hellcat fighter aircraft. Japan, on the other hand, pretty much relied on variants of the Zero fighter throughout the war. The Zero was a brilliant design in many respects, but by 1943 had clearly been surpassed by the newer American models. This pattern was repeated across every category of airplane in the two opposing arsenals. In addition, a large part of the American production total (some 97,810 units) was composed of multiengined (either two or four engines) bombers, whereas only 15,117 of the Japanese planes were bombers (which were universally two engine varieties). Thus, if one were to look at aircraft production in terms of total number of engines, total weight of aircraft produced, or total weight of combat payload, the differences in production would become even more pronounced.”

Bueno el texto prosigue y plantea el caso de que hubiera pasado si el Japón hubiera ganado de forma aplastante la batalla de Midway y hubiera destruido todos los portaviones americanos sin perder ninguno… Un interesante “what if” que queda instantáneamente sin efecto al saber que a finales de 1942 la flota aérea embarcada norteamericana sería no solo mayor que la japonesa sino y además de mayor calidad de aviones y pilotos.
La clave de todo estaba en una industria que fue capaz de botar mas barcos en los primeros 4 meses y medio de 1943 que el Japón en los SIETE años desde 1937 a 1945.
En otras palabras, no hacía falta una batalla de Midway y el resultado era irrelevante… El Japón se había condenado a si mismo a la derrota total una vez declaró la guerra a los EE.UU. Si a esto añadimos el potencial económico del Imperio Británico –que aunque concentrado en su guerra de supervivencia contra Alemania- podía poner en acción vemos como no había la menor posibilidad no ya de ganar la guerra.

El Japón o mas bién sus líderes militaristas pretendían despues de una descarada guerra de agresión en China, penetración en Indochina y sin olvidar su política colonial en Corea y Manchuria, conquistar todo el Sudeste de Asia y Oceanía y que los EE.UU. se rindiera ante los hechos.

Mannerheim
Miembro
Miembro
Mensajes: 403
Registrado: Vie Jul 20, 2007 4:29 pm
Ubicación: Zaragoza

Re: El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Mannerheim » Jue Oct 23, 2008 1:18 am

Hola,

exactamente como se definiria el "warmaking potential"?

Un saludo y muchas gracias.
"Haga la guerra con todo el mundo, pero la paz con Inglaterra"

El duque de Alba a Felipe II

Mannerheim
Miembro
Miembro
Mensajes: 403
Registrado: Vie Jul 20, 2007 4:29 pm
Ubicación: Zaragoza

Re: El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Mannerheim » Vie Oct 24, 2008 2:55 am

Mannerheim escribió:Hola,

exactamente como se definiria el "warmaking potential"?

Un saludo y muchas gracias.
Hola,

ya me respondo yo. He encontrado el mismo cuadro, pero con una explicacion en el primer capitulo del siguiente libro:

Europe at War 1939-1945: No Simple Victory
By Norman Davies
Published by Pan Macmillan, 2007
ISBN 0330352121, 9780330352123
544 pages

Este factor teorico se calcula a groso modo en base a la poblacion masculina joven disponible para ser movilizada en el ejercito, ponderada por factores economicos(PIB.....) que permitiran equipar y mantener este ejercito a medio y largo plazo. Un factor a tener en cuenta respecto a este dato es que aunque USA tendria tanto potencial como todo el resto de beligerantes juntos en 1937, era el que menos desarrollado tenia su ejercito en ese momento.

Un cordial saludo.
"Haga la guerra con todo el mundo, pero la paz con Inglaterra"

El duque de Alba a Felipe II

Avatar de Usuario
minoru genda
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 3362
Registrado: Vie Jun 24, 2005 11:25 pm
Contactar:

Re: El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por minoru genda » Vie Oct 24, 2008 2:20 pm

Hola mannerheim por mi parte no hay problema en leer el texto.
Pasa que un texto corto en ingles es perfectamente legible a poco que se intente leerlo o si acaso se copia y se pega en un traductor, pero éste texto es excesivamente largo para quienes no dominan bien el inglés y ya ni te cuento para quienes ni siquiera lo saben.
Por tanto sería de agradecer que lo tradujeras si te es posible y que para lo sucesivo presentes los artículos a ser posible en idioma castellano.
Para textos tan amplios que procedan de una página web el enlace debería ser suficiente y para textos de libros se puede traducir sobre la marcha y mientras se escribe.
Tengo en curso infinidad de cosas que se me antojan interminable y de las cuales hay bastantes que tengo que traducir parte de ellas desde otros idiomas, dispongo de los típicos traductores on-line, de diccionarios propios y de algunos conocimientos de inglés y francés y la verdad prefiero no hacer nada y no presentar nada antes que presentarlo para que quienes me lean tengan que traducirlo o solo sea accesible a unos pocos que sepan el idioma en cuestión.
Cuestión de respeto hacia todos vosotros, hacia la normativa en su segundo artículo y hacia mi propio idioma, el castellano.
De hecho en ocasiones colaboro en traducción de pequeñas cosas con otros compañeros, para hacer que el foro sea más asequible a quienes no han tenido la suerte o la oportunidad de aprender otro idioma.
Gracias por tu colaboración :wink:
No hay ningún viento favorable para quien no sabe a que puerto se dirige.
Schopenhauer
U-historia.com

Schwerpunkt
Moderador
Moderador
Mensajes: 1499
Registrado: Mar Oct 21, 2008 9:08 pm

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Schwerpunkt » Dom Oct 26, 2008 10:32 pm

Estimados Minoru Genda y Mannerheim:
Ya comenté en mi primer post que podía traducir para los que tuvieran dificultades en comprender este texto. Tened en cuenta que de acuerdo a la normativa del foro no he puesto todo el texto sino tan solo la parte fundamental en mi argumentación, dejándoos la lectura del link para los que queráis ver el artículo completo.
En cualquier caso me he permitido hacer una traducción propia del texto en cuestión así como de reeditar las tablas para su mejor comprensión. A continuación sigue la traducción del texto en inglés:
“No es un secreto que el Japón estaba, digamoslo así, “económicamente desaventajado” en su capacidad de llevar a cabo una Guerra contra los Aliados. Sin embargo la tremenda y sorprendente magnitud de su disparidad económica nunca ha cesado de sorprenderme. Para simplemente darles una idea de la magnitud de la desventaja, decidí compilar unas pocas estadísticas. La mayoría de éstas están extraídas del libro de Paul Kennedy's "Ascenso y Caída de las Grandes Potencias" (el cual entre otras cosas contiene un excelente análisis de las fuerzas económicas en liza en la II Guerra Mundial y es desde cualquier punto de vista un gran libro) y del libro de John Ellis' "II Guerra Mundial: Un estudio estadístico" En esta comparación me concentraré fundamentalmente en los dos principales antagonistas de la Guerra del Pacífico: Japón y Estados Unidos. Dicen que la economía es la “Ciencia Espantosa”; están a punto de ver porqué…
Visión general
Para el momento en que la II Guerra Mundial comenzó a encabritar su fea cabeza (oficialmente en 1939 en Polonia, no oficialmente en China en 1937), América había estado en las garras de la Gran Depresión durante una década. El efecto neto de la Depresión fue aflojar la economía de EE.UU. Muchos de los trabajadores de EE.UU. estaban desempleados (10 millones en 1939) or subempleados y nuestra base industrial tenía mucha mas capacidad de la que se necesitaba en aquel momento. En terminos económicos, nuestra “capacidad de utilización) era extremadamente baja. Para una cultura exterior, particularmente una militarista como el Japón, América podía parecer “blanda” y poco preparada para una gran guerra. Además los éxitos del Japón en la lucha contra oponentes mucho mas grandes (Rusia a principios de la década de 1900, y China en la década de 1930) y el hecho de que la propia economía del Japón estaba sobrecalentada (sobre todo como efecto de unos niveles poco saludables de gasto militar, un 28% de la renta nacional en 1937) probablemente provocó un sensación poco real de superioridad económica y militar sobre su mayor enemigo de ultramar. Sin embargo un observador desapasionado habría notado algunos hechos importantes. América, incluso sumida en sus depresiones económicas interminable, todavía poseía:
Casi dos veces la población del Japón
Diecisiete veces la renta nacional del Japón.
Cinco veces mas producción de acero.
Siete veces mas producción de carbón.
Ochenta (80) veces mas la producción de automóviles.

Además América poseía algunas desventajas ocultas que no aparecen en las cifras de producción. Las fábricas de EE.UU. eran en general mas modernas y automatizadas que las de Europa y Japón. Adicionalmente la práctica de gestión empresarial Americana era la major del mundo en aquella época. La productividad per cápita del trabajador Americano era la mayor del mundo sirva como comparación. Mas aún, los Estados Unidos estaban mas que dispuestos a utilizar a las mujeres americanas en el esfuerzo de guerra: una tremenda ventaja para nosotros y un concepto que las potencias del Eje no parecieron comprender hasta muy tarde en el conflicto. El efecto neto de todos estos factores significa que incluso en la sima de la Depresión el potencial bélico de América era alrededor de siete veces mayor que el Japón y que si el efecto debilitador de la depresión hubiera sido descontado, ¡hubiera sido mas cerca de las nueve o diez veces mayor! De hecho, según Kennedy, un desglose del potential bélico en 1937 parece algo así:
País % de potencial bélico total
Estados Unidos 41.7%
Alemania 14.4%
URSS 14.0%
Reino Unido 10.2%
Francia 4.2%
Japón 3.5%
Italia 2.5%
Siete Potencias total) 90.5%

Cuando los japoneses atacaron Pearl Harbor en diciembre de 1941, despertaron al gigante dormino y este se levantó en busca de pelea. E incluso cuando la mayoría del potencial bélico fue desviado para su uso contra Alemania (la cual era el enemigo absolutamente mas peligroso de los enemigos del Eje, por causa una vez mas de la economía) había todavía bastante para el uso contra el Japón. Para mediados de 1942, incluso antes de que se empezara a sentir globalmente, las fábricas americanas estaban comenzando a causar un efecto material en el progreso de la guerra. EE.UU. estaba arrojando cantidades ilimitadas de equipo y provisiones que no solo eran canalizadas a nuestras fuerzas sino a las de la Gran Bretaña y la URSS. En 1944 la mayoría de potencias, aunque todavía produciendo furiosamente, estaban comenzando a alcanzar el climax (la producción se estabilizaba) Esto era resultado de la destrucción de base industrial y agotamiento de recursos (en el caso de Alemania y Japón) o por agotamiento de mano de obra (como el caso de la Gran Bretaña y en cierta medida de la URSS). En contraste los Estados Unidos no sufrían ninguna de estas dificultades y como consecuencia su economía creció a una tasa anual del 15% durante todos los años de guerra. Incluso aunque suene un tanto aterrador, los Estados Unidos estaban simplemente “calentando”. No es quizás sorprendente que los EE.UU. computaran en 1945 alrededor del 50% del PIB total global.

Producción de guerra
¿ Cuales eran las producciones concretas, en terminos de “pan y blas” de las dos bases industrials en liza? He presentado varias estadísticas sobre este asunto en las siguientes tablas. Comenzaré con la producción de buques por ser un índice muy importante de poder en la Guerra del Pacífico.





Producción de barcos de guerra
EEUU CV/CVL/CVE BB CA/CL DD Escoltas Japón CV/CVL/CVE BB CA/CL DD Escoltas
1941 - 2 1 2 - 1941 6 1 - - ?
1942 18 4 8 82 - 1942 4 1 4 10 ?
1943 65 2 11 128 298 1943 2 - 3 12 ?
1944 45 2 14 74 194 1944 5 - 2 24 ?
1945 13 - 14 63 6 1945 - - - 17 ?
Total 141 10 48 349 498 Total 17 2 9 63 ?

Notas: CV/CVL/CVE = Portaaviones de todo tipo; BB = Acorazados; CA/CL= Cruceros pesados y ligeros; DD =Destructores; Escoltas = Destructores de escolta, fragatas y corbetas)

Hay que hacer un par de comentarios aquí. Primero la mayoría de portaviones listados de los EE.UU. eran portaviones de escolta llevando un par de docenas de aviones y adecuados mas bien para tareas de escolta que el servicio en primera línea (lo cual dicho sea de paso no minora su efectividad como plataformas de apoyo a tierra o guerra antisubmarina) Pero también hemos de señalar que los portaaviones americanos operaban alas aéreas sustancialmente mayores que sus oponentes japoneses. (80-90 contra 60-70 aviones). El efecto de esto: para 1944, cuando la Task Force 38 o 58 (dependiendo de si Halsey o Spruance estaban al mando de la principal fuerza de portaaviones del momento) podían contar con alrededor de un millar de aviones de combate. Ese tipo de proyección de poder y capacidad fue crucial para ganar la guerra –podíamos literalmente llevar mas aviones a la liza que la podía poner la defensa de cualquier base aérea en una isla, como atestigua la neutralización de las Islas Truk y Marshall.
La otra cifra importante aquí son los DD/Escoltas. El Japón, un imperio insular totalmente dependiente del mantenimiento de las vías marítimas para asegurar sus importaciones de materias primas, consiguió botar sesenta y tres destructores (de los cuales una veintena o así hubieran sido clasificados por los aliados como destructores de escolta) y un número sin especificar (pero de acuerdo a mis estimaciones relativamente pequeño) de buques de escolta. ¡ En el mismo período de tiempo los EE.UU. botaron ochocientos cuarenta y siete buques antisubmarinos ! Y este total no cubre siquiera los yates armadas y cazas auxiliaries que utilizamos en el este contra los submarines alemanes. Desde cualquier punto de vista el poder naval americano no tenía precedente. ¡ De hecho en 1945 la marina de EE.UU. eran mayor que todas las flotas del resto del mundo combinadas !

La Guerra del Pacífico fue también en gran medida una guerra de marinas mercantes, en la que prácticamente todo lo que se necesitaba para defender y/o asaltar las diversas islas que formaban la línea de protección del Imperio japonés, tenían que ser transportadas a través de vastas extensiones del océano. El Japón también tenía que mantener sus vitales arterias marítimas a lugares como Borneo y Java para mantener su base industrial suministrada. Una mirada a la producción naval de ambos antagonistas es muy esclarecedora.
Producción de barcos mercantes (en tons)

Año Estados Unidos Japón
1939 376,419 320,466
1940 528,697 293,612
1941 1,031,974 210,373
1942 5,479,766 260,059
1943 11,448,360 769,085
1944 9,288,156 1,699,203
1945 5,839,858 599,563
Total 33,993,230 4,152,361

Cada vez que miro estos numerous, muevo mi cabeza con asombro. Los Estados Unidos construyeron mas marina mercante en los primeros cuatro meses y medio de 1943 que lo que el Japón botó en siete años. Otra cosas realmente interesante es que no hubo incremento significativo en el programa de construcción naval hasta 1943, tiempo en el que era ya demasiado tarde para detener la sangría. Al igual que con sus programas de contrucción de escoltas navales los japoneses operaban bajo la trágica y sesgada estrategia nacional que dictaba que la guerra contra los Estados Unidos sería corta. De nuevo los Estados Unidos dedicaron gran parte de la marina mercante que botaron a reemplazar las pérdidas infringidas por los submarinos alemanes. No es broma el decir que podíamos botar mas barcos que los que cualquiera podía hundir literalmente sino que teníamos bastante de sobra para llevar montañas de material a las extensiones abandonadas de la mano de Dios del Pacífico. Esos cultos polinesios no empezaron sin razón…
Finalmente un examen de la Guerra del Pacífico no sería completa sin echar una mirada al poder aéreo. A pesar de todo el discurso sobre la guerra del Pacífico como guerra de portaaviones, un portaaviones no es mas que un vehículo para llevar un avión al área de operaciones. Si bien los aviones no pueden tomar y mantener las islas por ellos mismos, la supremacía aérea era vital para asegurar que tales bastiones se pudieran reducir y capturar. Abajo hay una tabla que describe la producción de aviones de ambos antagonistas:
Producción de aviones
Año Estados Unidos Japón
1939 5,856 4,467
1940 12,804 4,768
1941 26,277 5,088
1942 47,836 8,861
1943 85,898 16,693
1944 96,318 28,180
1945 49,761 8,263
Total 324,750 76,320

De nuevo, una tremenda diferencia. No solo, eran capaces los Aliados de producir muchos mas aviones, sino que muchos de ellos eran de un diseño mas modern como los cazas F4U Corsair and F6F Hellcat. El Japón por otro lado siguió basandose en variante del caza Zero durante toda la Guerra. El Zero era un diseño brillante en muchos aspectos, pero en 1943 había sido claramente sobrepasado por los nuevos modelos americanos. Este comportamiento se repetía en cada categoría de aviones de los arsenals contrarios. Por añadidura una gran parte de la producción total americana (unas 97,810 unidades) estaba compuesta por bombarderos bimotores y cuadrimotores mientras que tan solo 15,117 de los japoneses eran bombarderos (los cuales eran variantes bimotoras sin excepción) Así, si miramos a la producción de aviones en función de número total de motores, peso total de los aviones, o carga de combate las diferencias en producción serían incluso mas acusadas.”
Como detalle adicional a la tremenda inferioridad material del Japón simplemente comentar que una de las razones de la guerra –la dependencia del Japón del petróleo- ni tan siquiera pudo ser subsanada a pesar de haber capturado los campos petrolíferos de las Indias Holandesas. Incluso durante la campaña de las islas Salomón, una de las razones por las que el Japón no pudo poner toda la carne en el asador fue la escasez de petróleo –mejor dicho de productos refinados- para operaciones sostenidas con parte de la Flota Combinada. Con el transcurso de la guerra esa inferioridad iría acusándose.

Mannerheim
Miembro
Miembro
Mensajes: 403
Registrado: Vie Jul 20, 2007 4:29 pm
Ubicación: Zaragoza

Re: El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Mannerheim » Lun Oct 27, 2008 3:35 am

minoru genda escribió:Hola mannerheim por mi parte no hay problema en leer el texto.
Pasa que un texto corto en ingles es perfectamente legible a poco que se intente leerlo o si acaso se copia y se pega en un traductor, pero éste texto es excesivamente largo para quienes no dominan bien el inglés y ya ni te cuento para quienes ni siquiera lo saben.
Por tanto sería de agradecer que lo tradujeras si te es posible y que para lo sucesivo presentes los artículos a ser posible en idioma castellano.
Para textos tan amplios que procedan de una página web el enlace debería ser suficiente y para textos de libros se puede traducir sobre la marcha y mientras se escribe.
Tengo en curso infinidad de cosas que se me antojan interminable y de las cuales hay bastantes que tengo que traducir parte de ellas desde otros idiomas, dispongo de los típicos traductores on-line, de diccionarios propios y de algunos conocimientos de inglés y francés y la verdad prefiero no hacer nada y no presentar nada antes que presentarlo para que quienes me lean tengan que traducirlo o solo sea accesible a unos pocos que sepan el idioma en cuestión.
Cuestión de respeto hacia todos vosotros, hacia la normativa en su segundo artículo y hacia mi propio idioma, el castellano.
De hecho en ocasiones colaboro en traducción de pequeñas cosas con otros compañeros, para hacer que el foro sea más asequible a quienes no han tenido la suerte o la oportunidad de aprender otro idioma.
Gracias por tu colaboración :wink:
Hola Minoru,

supongo que este llamamiento se lo querías hacer al compañero Schwerpunkt, que es el que posteó el texto original en inglés y que, por otro lado, ya ha tenido la amabilidad de traducir. Tampoco me hubiera importado traducirlo a mi en cuanto tuviera un poco de tiempo, ya que me ha interesado bastante. :wink:

Saludos cordiales.
"Haga la guerra con todo el mundo, pero la paz con Inglaterra"

El duque de Alba a Felipe II

Avatar de Usuario
minoru genda
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 3362
Registrado: Vie Jun 24, 2005 11:25 pm
Contactar:

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por minoru genda » Lun Oct 27, 2008 1:57 pm

Cierto Mannerheim te debo una disculpa y otra a Schwerpunkt, he tenido un pequeño desliz al citar la autoría del artículo, además de mi agradecimiento a ambos :wink:
No hay ningún viento favorable para quien no sabe a que puerto se dirige.
Schopenhauer
U-historia.com

Schwerpunkt
Moderador
Moderador
Mensajes: 1499
Registrado: Mar Oct 21, 2008 9:08 pm

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Schwerpunkt » Vie Jul 31, 2009 12:25 am

Estimado Minoru:

Aunque sea con retraso imperdonable debido a mi falta de familiaridad con la bajada de archivos gráficos aquí están las tablas de los datos que puse hace varios meses y que permiten ver los datos con claridad.

En primer lugar os pongo la tabla de botadura de barcos mercantes en toneladas de desplazamiento bruto entre EE.UU. y Japón. Creo que las cifras hablan por sí solas:

Imagen

Y a continuación la botadura de buques de guerra en unidades.

Imagen

Notas a la tabla:
BB: Acorazados
CA: Cruceros pesados
CL: Cruceros ligeros
CV: Portaaviones de batalla o pesados
CVL: Portaaviones ligeros o de escolta
DD: Destructores
Subs: Submarinos

Ya he comentado antes que en general todas las unidades navales norteamericanas eran más modernas, dotadas de un radar infinitamente mejor y con una abundancia de suministros y comunicaciones que ya hubieran querido las unidades japonesas más elitistas. Hay que reseñar que en 1944 ante la certeza de la victoria los EE.UU. comenzaron a aminorar el programa de construcción naval.

Más que ningún otro comentario, éste demuestra a las claras la imposibilidad por parte del Japón Imperial de no ya ganar la guerra sino de llegar a algún tipo de empate...

Avatar de Usuario
juankamilo
Miembro
Miembro
Mensajes: 163
Registrado: Sab Nov 08, 2008 2:12 am

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por juankamilo » Vie Jul 31, 2009 3:09 am

El texto introductorio del artículo esbosa un poco la mentalidad japonesa de la decada de los 30, y el motivo que impulsó a Japón a declarar la guerra a los EE.UU. Creían que por haber vencido a países grandes como Rusia en 1905 y estar venciendo a China en la guerra actual, se las arreglarían para vencer a los EE.UU, si las cosas les salían bien, de un solo golpe, que fue lo que pretendieron en PH.

El problema de los regímenes fascistas, es que parte de su ideología rescata los valores nacionales hasta sobrevalorarlos y por añadidura, subvalorar a las demás naciones. No por nada, tanto alemanes como japoneses creían que los estadounidenses eran todos unos playboys, cobardes y buena vida, creencia que se vio alimentada por su aislacionismo durante los primeros años de la guerra. El gobierno militar japonés se encargó de convencer a su pueblo de que Japón estaba llamado a dominar el mundo entero, que eran una raza escogida y que su espíritu podría vencer las más arduas dificultades materiales (como la produccion industrial) y era como si esperaran que cada uno de sus soldados valiera por diez o más de los americanos, aún cuando estuvieran peor equipados, alimentados, dotados, entrenados, en fin, sólo porque eran de raza nipona.

Otro factor era que el ejército y la marina de los EE.UU para 1941 eran deplorables en comparación a lo que llegaron a ser en 1945, un elemento que influenció considerablemente a los japoneses, quienes no se detuvieron a analizar la capacidad industrial y humana de su enemigo en el mediano plazo (el elemento "warmaking" que menciona el artículo) y sólo se concentraron en el tamaño del ejército en ese momento.

Termino diciendo que me gustó mucho el artículo y es impresionante la diferencia entre la capacidad de producción estadounidense y las demás potencias de la época.

"The tree of Liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants".
Thomas Jefferson

Imagen

Avatar de Usuario
Eriol
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 8693
Registrado: Dom Ago 17, 2008 10:51 pm
Ubicación: Ciudad Real

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Eriol » Vie Jul 31, 2009 12:50 pm

No obstante yo quiero preguntar unas cosas
¿del total de mercantes construidos por USA cuantos se perdieron en el atlantico?¿y cuantos estaban sirviendo alli?Lo digo por que esos habria que descontarlos de lo referente a la lucha contra el japon.
Lo mismo cabe decir sobre los portaaviones y acorazados ya que alguno que otro estaba en el atlantico y artico enfrentandose a los submarinos y corsarios articos.
Saludos!
Una vision; un propósito;un sueño...Siempre.

Avatar de Usuario
minoru genda
Moderador Honorario
Moderador Honorario
Mensajes: 3362
Registrado: Vie Jun 24, 2005 11:25 pm
Contactar:

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por minoru genda » Dom Ago 02, 2009 12:32 pm

Swerpunkt.
No hay nada que perdonar, al menos en los foros que yo modero, no hay circunstancias ni normas que indiquen cuando alguien debe escribir un artículo o agregar cuadros o cosas para complementarlo, se entiende que si alguien tarda en hacer algo tiene sus lógicas razones por peregrinas que puedan parecernos y se entiende que es en el momento que lo hace cuando ha podido hacerlo y añado que personalmente agradezco inmensamente que todo colaboréis aportando datos y comentarios o haciendo preguntas que sirvan para ir mejorando lo que ya se tiene.
Eriol
Eso que preguntas es complicado de responder porque habria que consultar muchos datos.
En principio se debe tener en cuenta de que la navegación de buques mercantes en el Pacífico era menos peligrosa que la del Atlántico; el Pacífico Oriental (costas del oeste de EE.UU) era una zona tranquila y entre los puertos estadounidenses de esa zona se podía navegar con bastabnte seguridad, no ocurría lo mismo en el Atlantico, donde las operaciones llevadas a cabo por los U-boote dieron como resultado el hundimiento de cantidad de buques aliados, incluso junto a la costa Este de Estados Unidos donde los lugareños observaban con cierta frecuencia los incendios de petroleros muy cerca de la costa producidos por algún ataque de un U-boote, sobre todo durante la Operación Paukenschlag.
Si acaso podemos citar como zonas de riesgo potencial para las líneas marítimas transitadas por buques mercantes las próximas al Pacífico occidental (Filipinas, Formosa, islas de Indonesia, islas Molucas, islas Célebes, entorno de Australia y territorios insulares adyacentes, Islas Salomón, y en general todas las zonas situadas al oeste de las islas Hawaii.
Por tanto se deduce que los hundimientos de buques mercantes en el Pacífico fueron muy inferiores a los ocurridos en el Atlántico e incluso en el Índico donde las incursiones de algunos sumergibles y buques corsarios causaron algunos quebraderos de cabeza a los aliados
No hay ningún viento favorable para quien no sabe a que puerto se dirige.
Schopenhauer
U-historia.com

Avatar de Usuario
José Luis
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 9156
Registrado: Sab Jun 11, 2005 3:06 am
Ubicación: España

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por José Luis » Lun Ago 03, 2009 11:05 am

¡Hola a todos!
Eriol escribió:No obstante yo quiero preguntar unas cosas
¿del total de mercantes construidos por USA cuantos se perdieron en el atlantico?¿y cuantos estaban sirviendo alli?Lo digo por que esos habria que descontarlos de lo referente a la lucha contra el japon.
Lo mismo cabe decir sobre los portaaviones y acorazados ya que alguno que otro estaba en el atlantico y artico enfrentandose a los submarinos y corsarios articos.
Saludos!
La cifra de navegación mercante destruida en el Atlántico por los submarinos alemanes fue importante, pero jamás decisiva, al contrario de lo que sucedió con la navegación mercante japonesa destruida por los submarinos aliados. Los submarinos estadounidenses en el Pacífico hundieron el 55 por ciento (4,8 millones de toneladas) del total del transporte japonés destruido, mientras que los submarinos alemanes en el Atlántico hundieron el 60 por ciento (14,57 millones de toneladas) del total del transporte aliado destruido. Los alemanes perdieron unos 781 submarinos y 39.000 hombres en esa aventura, mientras que los estadounidenses perdieron 52 submarinos y 3.500 hombres en la suya (y téngase en cuenta que los submarinos estadounidenses sólo comenzaron a concentrar sus ataques sobre la flota mercante japonesa a partir de 1943).

El mando japonés era perfectamente conocedor del cul de sac estratégico en que se encontraba su país desde el embargo de petróleo decretado por Estados Unidos el 1 de agosto de 1941. O el gobierno japonés aceptaba las condiciones estadounidenses (principalmente concernientes a China) o Japón estaba destinado a la ruina, ya fuera en una guerra o en el bloqueo económico (o en ambas cosas a la vez, como sucedió). Tal como dijo el jefe del Estado Mayor General de la Marina Imperial, almirante Nagano Osami, al emperador Hirohito, era mejor luchar que aceptar la derrota mediante la estrangulación económica, o con sus propias palabras, era mejor "arriesgarse a una guerra que a la vergüenza". La única posibilidad de éxito a corto plazo para el Japón era buscar, encontrar y ganar una gran batalla naval en la que diezmase a la flota americana del Pacífico, pero esto nunca ocurrió. Fuera del ataque sorpresa a Pearl Harbor (que fue un fracaso en esa búsqueda), los japoneses tuvieron, en cambio, tres grandes combates navales (Midway, Filipinas/Marianas y Leyte) y otros combates menores en vez de la gran batalla.

Quizás el hecho más ilustrativo de la abismal diferencia del potencial que había entre ambas potencias, los aliados y Japón, es que los aliados sólo desplegaron el 5 por ciento de su potencia militar total en el Pacífico, lo que pone de relieve la importancia crucial del bloqueo económico marítimo en la derrota de Japón.

Fuente: Euan Graham, Japan's Sea Lane Security, 1940-2004. A matter of life and death? (Taylor & Francis e-Library, 2006). Véanse en especial pp. 77 y ss.

Saludos cordiales
José Luis
"Dioses, no me juzguéis como un dios
sino como un hombre
a quien ha destrozado el mar" (Plegaria fenicia)

Mac_aco
Colaborador económico
Mensajes: 400
Registrado: Lun Nov 03, 2008 8:59 pm
Ubicación: Málaga/Sevilla/Barcelona

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Mac_aco » Lun Ago 03, 2009 6:25 pm

"Quizás el hecho más ilustrativo de la abismal diferencia del potencial que había entre ambas potencias, los aliados y Japón, es que los aliados sólo desplegaron el 5 por ciento de su potencia militar total en el Pacífico, lo que pone de relieve la importancia crucial del bloqueo económico marítimo en la derrota de Japón.

Fuente: Euan Graham, Japan's Sea Lane Security, 1940-2004. A matter of life and death? (Taylor & Francis e-Library, 2006). Véanse en especial pp. 77 y ss"

José Luis, esa cifra del 5% se explica en esa obra como se obtiene?
Gracias por anticipado.
"Durante muchos meses hemos combatido juntos, a menudo en el mismo bando"
Carta del Gral J.Devers al Gral De Lattre, mayo de 1945.

Avatar de Usuario
José Luis
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 9156
Registrado: Sab Jun 11, 2005 3:06 am
Ubicación: España

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por José Luis » Lun Ago 03, 2009 9:08 pm

Mac_aco escribió: José Luis, esa cifra del 5% se explica en esa obra como se obtiene?
No. Sólo se anota la fuente (nota 120):
R. Goralski and R. W. Freeburg, Oil & War: How the Deadly Struggle for Fuel in WWII Meant Victory or Defeat, New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1987, pp. 246-247

Saludos cordiales
José Luis
"Dioses, no me juzguéis como un dios
sino como un hombre
a quien ha destrozado el mar" (Plegaria fenicia)

Avatar de Usuario
Eriol
Miembro distinguido
Miembro distinguido
Mensajes: 8693
Registrado: Dom Ago 17, 2008 10:51 pm
Ubicación: Ciudad Real

El harakiri político-militar japonés

Mensaje por Eriol » Lun Ago 03, 2009 9:15 pm

José Luis escribió:¡Hola a todos!
Eriol escribió:No obstante yo quiero preguntar unas cosas
¿del total de mercantes construidos por USA cuantos se perdieron en el atlantico?¿y cuantos estaban sirviendo alli?Lo digo por que esos habria que descontarlos de lo referente a la lucha contra el japon.
Lo mismo cabe decir sobre los portaaviones y acorazados ya que alguno que otro estaba en el atlantico y artico enfrentandose a los submarinos y corsarios articos.
Saludos!
La cifra de navegación mercante destruida en el Atlántico por los submarinos alemanes fue importante, pero jamás decisiva, al contrario de lo que sucedió con la navegación mercante japonesa destruida por los submarinos aliados. Los submarinos estadounidenses en el Pacífico hundieron el 55 por ciento (4,8 millones de toneladas) del total del transporte japonés destruido, mientras que los submarinos alemanes en el Atlántico hundieron el 60 por ciento (14,57 millones de toneladas) del total del transporte aliado destruido. Los alemanes perdieron unos 781 submarinos y 39.000 hombres en esa aventura, mientras que los estadounidenses perdieron 52 submarinos y 3.500 hombres en la suya (y téngase en cuenta que los submarinos estadounidenses sólo comenzaron a concentrar sus ataques sobre la flota mercante japonesa a partir de 1943).


José Luis

Excelente aporte Jose Luis.Como siempre a tu nivel.
Pero hay algo que me gustaria aclarar.Espero estes de acuerdo conmigo.Y es que dudo que los submarinos americanos se encontrasen alguna vez con los "problemas" que se encontraban los submarinos alemanes al atacar los convoyes aliados;el mismo uso del convoy,el radar,la aviacion embarcada...es por eso que pienso es mui logica la mayor perdida en vidas de la los U-boote.
¿Que opinas respecto a eso?
Saludos!
Una vision; un propósito;un sueño...Siempre.

Responder

Volver a “Frente del Pacífico”

TEST