pub01.jpg

Entrevista al Dr. Craig W. H. Luther

Preguntas, dudas, comentarios sobre bibliografía

Moderador: David L

Responder
Avatar de Usuario
José Luis
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 9226
Registrado: Sab Jun 11, 2005 3:06 am
Ubicación: España

Entrevista al Dr. Craig W. H. Luther

Mensaje por José Luis » Mar Sep 18, 2018 11:19 am

¡Hola a todos!

El Dr. Craig W. H. Luther (doctorado en historia europea moderna en la Universidad de California, Santa Barbara) es un historiador retirado de la U. S. Air Force y un investigador de las operaciones militares alemanas que ha escrito varios libros sobre la IIGM.

Quisiera explicar las razones que me llevaron a realizar esta entrevista, o cómo llegué a ella. Hace dos o tres años leí unas buenas reseñas de lectores de un libro del Dr. Luther titulado Barbarossa Unleashed: The German Blitzkrieg Through Central Russia to the Gates of Moscow June-December 1941 (Schiffer, 2014). Siempre estoy especialmente interesado en las novedades editoriales sobre la Operación Barbarroja, y la buena acogida que tuvo este libro entre los lectores que tuvieron a bien reseñarlo me llevaron a indagar un poco más en este libro, esta vez buscando las opiniones de historiadores profesionales que ya habían escrito sobre la guerra en el Frente Oriental. Y me encontré con unas reseñas de Mawdsley, Glantz y Stahel que encomiaban el trabajo del Dr. Luther. Así que me hice con el libro y tras leerlo quedé gratamente sorprendido, no sólo por el lúcido análisis que hace su autor sobre la planificación operacional de la campaña, el desarrollo de las operaciones del HM, su acertado énfasis en señalar las batallas de y en torno a Smolensk en julio y agosto de 1941 como el punto de estancamiento de la Operación Barbarroja...sino también y especialmente por su introducción de lo que pensaba el simple soldado alemán como punto de vista del desarrollo de la campaña.

Mi segunda y grata sorpresa con el Dr. Luther vino dada cuando visité su blog https://www.barbarossa1941.com/ donde me encontré con el voluminoso material de investigación utilizado por el autor para su Barbarossa Unleashed. Como expliqué en el hilo del subforo “Linkoteca” donde di a conocer el blog del Dr. Luther ( viewtopic.php?f=22&p=406518&sid=8d5cd3e ... 3e#p406518 ), quedé realmente admirado al ver el tremendo esfuerzo de generosidad que significa poner a disposición pública un inestimable archivo gráfico y documental exquisitamente editado y anotado.

Mi descubrimiento del blog del Dr. Luther fue la razón principal que me llevó a enviarle un correo de sincero agradecimiento por ese dechado de generosidad y transparencia, algo sin precedentes en lo que yo conozco en otros historiadores. Recibí como respuesta un amable correo donde el Dr. Luther me indicaba que quedaba abierto a responder cualquier pregunta que yo pudiera hacerle sobre su carrera académica, su obra o cualquier otro tema relacionado con su blog. Y sin dudarlo un instante, me puse nuevamente en contacto con él para que considerara la posibilidad de hacerle una entrevista para la comunidad de nuestro foro. Dicho y hecho. La breve entrevista que sigue fue realizada vía email el 17 de septiembre de 2018, y la traslado aquí en su original inglés, en primer lugar, y mi traducción al español, finalmente. Las llamadas (*) son notas mías.

José Luis: As a military historian (US Air Force), when did you start researching and writing about WWII?

Dr. Luther: My first book was published in 1980 (I became a USAF historian in 1984) by Bender Publishing; it is entitled, "Rommel: A Narrative and Pictorial History." In 1987, I published my first truly academic work, "Blood and Honor: The History of the 12th SS Panzer-Division 'Hitler Youth,' 1943/45." The latter was originally my doctoral dissertation; it was republished in 2012 with new material by Schiffer Books. "First Day on the Eastern Front" is my fifth book, and I have completed on more book -- a meticulously edited and annotated version of the eastern front memoir of Dr. Heinrich Haape, "Moscow Tram Stop," that hopefully will appear next year.

José Luis: I suppose that your special focus on the military history of the Eastern Front is due to the fact that, in my view, it was in this theater that WWII was really decided. But I only guess. So, what were the reasons by which a US Air Force's military historian focused his research on the Nazi-Soviet war and not on the war in North Africa, Italy, Normandy, France, or the Pacific, where the Western Powers also played a crucial role for the final outcome of the war?

Dr. Luther: My love of WW2 history, and, particularly, my fascination with German military operations, long predates my becoming a USAF historian. Over the past two decades, I have concentrated on the eastern front for several reasons. First of all, ever since I was teenager I was fascinated by the unprecedented scope of the combat in the east. However one measures it, the eastern front was the most apocalyptic conflict in recorded human history. The size of the battlefield, the number of participants, the massive tank battles, the human and material cost of the conflict--they all dwarf what occurred in the western theater, the Balkans and North Africa. In addition, many of the leading characters -- from Hitler and Stalin to Guderian and Zhukov -- are fascinating figures worthy of detailed study in their own right.

José Luis: What was your first work, article or book, about WWII?

Dr. Luther: My very first article was published in a local newspaper in Palo Alto, California. It was 1979 (I was 28 years old), and just before the Olympics that were planned to take place in Soviet Russia. At the time, there was a documentary series about the Russo-German War that was being shown on U.S. television. Even at that time, however, I knew that part of the documentary was simply Russian propaganda. When, in one episode, they pinned the Katyn woods massacre on the Germans, I felt compelled to respond and wrote an article correcting the falsehoods in the T.V. series. As was well known even then, the massacres of Polish officers (at Katyn and several other locations) occurred in 1940. Forensic analysis by the German Red Cross in the spring of 1943 confirmed that the Katyn woods massacre had occurred well before the German invasion. My article stirred up a fair amount of controversy, as "letters to the editor" revealed. I'll never forgot one of the letters, which began: "Craig Who?"! By the way, following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in December 1979, the U.S. pulled out of the 1980 Olympics.

José Luis: Barbarossa Unleashed is a book that has received very good reviews not only from readers but also from great Eastern Front historians, such as David Glantz, David Stahel, or Evan Mawdsley. What were, in your opinion, the three decisive factors that ultimately decided the final failure of Barbarossa? And what are the basic theses on which your book has developed?

Dr. Luther: If I had to select several reasons for the failure of Operation Barbarossa, I would begin with the fact that the German invasion was underpowered. By that, I mean that the force structure of the German "Ostheer" was simply not large enough to get the job done; to make matters worse, Hitler basically "starved" the Ostheer after the attack began, providing it with little in the way of personnel replacements, or replacement tanks and aircraft. Secondly, the Red Army proved to be much larger (in virtually every respect!) and more capable than the Germans had thought possible; while the Germans (through signals and aerial reconnaissance) had a good picture of Red Army forces along the frontier to a depth of 2-300 kilometers inland, they were completely unaware of the Red Army's second echelon of forces, which they eventually encountered along the Dnepr-Dvina river lines. By the end of 1941, the Soviet mobilization system had created 50 new armies, which slowed and attrited the German advance until it collapsed at the gates of Moscow. A third factor has to be the almost cavalier nature of German military planning for the campaign--that is, in almost every instance, on issues ranging from operations to logistics--the Germans assumed the best outcome, and had no "Plan B" to deal with failure. Indeed, after the Battle of Smolensk, the entire German campaign was basically improvised.

José Luis: The First Day on the Eastern Front: Germany Invades the Soviet Union, June 22, 1941 is your last book, forthcoming in fall. What can we expect from this new book?

Dr. Luther: My new work, "First Day on the Eastern Front," addresses the first 21 hours of Hitler's surprise attack on Soviet Russia in granular detail (the Germans attacked just after 0300 hours on Sunday, 22 June 1941). The book (large format, hard cover, 504 pp, 60 b/w photos, 18 maps) is based on both German and Soviet archival materials, with lots of graphic personal accounts by participants on both sides. The idea of doing such a book had intrigued me for a number of years; this is because the events of 22 June mirrored in microcosm the scale and horror of the entire Russo-German war, which lasted for almost 3 1/2 years (1418 days to be exact). The use of the Soviet archival documents (translated on my behalf by a top-notch Russian-English translator) added a balance to the book that is missing from many western accounts of the war.

José Luis: Are you working on a new project about WWII?

Dr. Luther: I am hoping to collaborate with Dr David Stahel on a new project. We want to produce an anthology of letters and diary entries of German soldiers for the first 9 months of Barbarossa (Jun 41 - Mar 42). We've made our proposal to the publisher (Stackpole Books) and are waiting for their response.

Traducción de la entrevista
:

José Luis: Como historiador militar (U. S. Air Force), ¿cuándo comenzó a investigar y escribir sobre la IIGM?

Dr. Luther: 1) Mi primer libro fue publicado en 1980 (me convertí en historiador de la USAF en 1984) por Bender Publishing; se tituló “Rommel: A Narrative and Pictorial History”. En 1987 publiqué mi primera obra realmente académica, “Blood and Honor: The History of the 12th SS Panzer-Division 'Hitler Youth,' 1943/45."*. La última fue originalmente mi disertación doctoral; fue reeditada en 2012 con nuevo material por Schiffer Books. “First Day on the Eastern Front” es mi quinto libro, y he completado un libro más, una versión meticulosamente editada y anotada de las memorias del frente oriental del Dr. Heinrich Haape, “Moscow Tramp Stop”, que con suerte aparecerá el próximo año**.

José Luis: Supongo que su atención especial en la historia militar del Frente Oriental se debe al hecho de que, en mi opinión, fue en este teatro donde se decidió realmente la IIGM. Pero sólo supongo. Así pues, ¿cuáles fueron las razones por las que un historiador militar de la U. S. Air Force centró su investigación en la guerra nazi-soviética y no en la guerra en África del Norte, Italia, Normandía, Francia, o el Pacífico, donde las Potencias Occidentales también jugaron un papel crucial para el desenlace final de la guerra?

Dr. Luther: Mi pasión por la historia de la IIGM, y, en particular, mi fascinación con las operaciones militares alemanas, precede en mucho mi entrada como historiador de la USAF. En las últimas dos décadas me he concentrado en el frente oriental por varias razones. Ante todo, desde mi adolescencia, estuve fascinado por el alcance sin precedentes del combate en el este. Como quiera que se mire, el frente oriental fue el conflicto más apocalíptico de la historia humana registrada. El tamaño del campo de batalla, el número de participantes, las batallas masivas de tanques, el coste humano y material del conflicto, todo ello empequeñece lo que ocurrió en el teatro occidental, los Balcanes y África del Norte. Además, muchos de los personajes principales -desde Hitler y Stalin a Guderian y Zhukov- son figuras fascinantes dignas de un estudio detallado por derecho propio.

José Luis: ¿Cuál fue su primer trabajo, artículo o libro, sobre la SGM?

Dr. Luther: Mi primer artículo fue publicado en un periódico local en Palo Alto, California. Era 1979 (yo tenía 28 años), y justo antes de los Juegos Olímpicos que estaban previstos tuvieran lugar en la Rusia soviética. En ese momento, había una serie documental sobre la guerra ruso-alemana que estaba siendo emitida en la televisión estadounidense. Sin embargo, incluso en ese momento sabía que parte del documental era simplemente propaganda rusa. Cuando, en un episodio, atribuyeron a los alemanes la masacre del bosque de Katyn, me sentí obligado a responder y escribir un artículo corrigiendo las falsedades de la serie de TV. Como era bien sabido incluso entonces, las masacres de oficiales polacos (en Katyn y otros lugares) tuvieron lugar en 1940. El análisis forense de la Cruz Roja alemana en la primavera de 1943 confirmó que la masacre del bosque de Katyn había ocurrido mucho antes de la invasión alemana. Mi artículo suscitó no poca controversia, como revelaron las “cartas al editor”. Nunca olvidaré una de las cartas, que comenzó: “Craig ¿quién?” Por cierto, tras la invasión soviética de Afganistán en diciembre de 1979, Estados Unidos se retiró de los Juegos Olímpicos de 1980.

José Luis: Barbarossa Unleashed es un libro que ha recibido muy buenas reseñas no sólo de lectores sino también de grandes historiadores del Frente Oriental, como David Glantz, David Stahel, o Evan Mawdsley. ¿Cuáles fueron, en su opinión, los tres factores decisivos que decidieron en última instancia el fracaso final de Barbarroja? ¿Y cuáles son las tesis básicas sobre las que se desarrolla su libro?

Dr. Luther: Si tuviera que elegir varias razones por el fracaso de la Operación Barbarroja, comenzaría con el hecho de que la invasión alemana fue poco potente. Con esto quiero decir que la estructura de fuerza del “Ostheer” alemán simplemente no era lo suficientemente grande para conseguir hacer el trabajo; para empeorar las cosas, básicamente Hitler “debilitó” al Ostheer después de comenzado el ataque, proporcionándole poco en la forma de reemplazos de personal, o tanques y aviones de reemplazo. En segundo lugar, el Ejército Rojo demostró ser mucho más grande (¡en casi todos los aspectos!) y más capaz de lo que los alemanes habían creído posible; aunque los alemanes (mediante comunicaciones y reconocimiento aéreo) tenían un buen cuadro de las fuerzas del Ejército Rojo a lo largo de la frontera hasta una profundidad de 2-300 kilómetros hacia el interior, desconocían por completo el segundo escalón de fuerzas del Ejército Rojo, que finalmente encontraron a lo largo de las líneas de los ríos Dnepr-Dvina. A finales de 1941, el sistema de movilización soviético había creado 50 ejércitos nuevos, que ralentizaron y desgastaron el avance alemán hasta que colapsó a las puertas de Moscú. Un tercer factor ha de ser la naturaleza casi arrogante de la planificación militar alemana para la campaña; es decir, en casi todos los casos, en cuestiones que van desde operaciones hasta logística, los alemanes asumieron el mejor resultado, y no tenían ningún “Plan B” para resolver el fracaso. De hecho, tras la Batalla de Smolensk, toda la campaña alemana fue básicamente improvisada.

José Luis: The First Day on the Eastern Front: Germany Invades the Soviet Union, June 22, 1941 es su último libro, previsto en otoño. ¿Qué podemos esperar de este nuevo libro?

Dr. Luther: Mi nuevo trabajo, “First Day on the Eastern Front”, aborda en detalle granular las primeras 21 horas del ataque sorpresa de Hitler sobre la Rusia soviética (los alemanes atacaron justo después de las 0300 horas del domingo 22 de junio de 1941). El libro (gran formato, tapa dura, 504 pp., 60 fotos en blanco y negro, 18 mapas) se basa en material de archivo alemán y soviético, con un montón de reportes personales gráficos de los participantes de ambos bandos. La idea de hacer un libro así me había intrigado durante varios años; esto se debe a que los hechos del 22 de junio reflejaron en microcosmo la escala y el horror de toda la guerra ruso-alemana, que duró casi tres años y medio (1.418 días para ser exactos). El uso de documentos de archivo soviéticos (traducidos en mi nombre por un excelente traductor de ruso-inglés) añadió un equilibrio ausente en muchos relatos occidentales de la guerra.

José Luis: ¿Está trabajando en un nuevo proyecto sobre la IIGM?

Dr. Luther: Espero colaborar con el Dr. David Stahel en un nuevo proyecto. Queremos hacer una antología de cartas y entradas de diarios de soldados alemanes durante los primeros 9 meses de Barbarroja (junio-41/marzo-42). Hemos hecho nuestra propuesta al editor (Stackpole Books) y estamos esperando su respuesta.

*Craig W. H. Luther, Blood and Honor: The History of the 12th SS Panzer Division Hitler Youth (Schiffer Publishing, 2012). Véase https://www.amazon.com/Blood-Honor-Hist ... tler+Youth

**El Dr. Heinrich Haape (1910-1976) sirvió como médico de batallón en la 6ª División Panzer durante la Operación Barbarroja. En 1957 la editorial Collins publicó su libro de memorias titulado Moscow Tram Stop: A Doctor's Experiences with the German Spearhead in Russia.

Y esto es todo. Sólo me queda, esta vez en nombre del foro, agradecer al Dr. Luther su amable disposición para conceder esta entrevista y dar su permiso para publicarla aquí. Y a los compañeros del foro les recomiendo la lectura de la obra de este excelente investigador e historiador. Sospecho que su próximo libro. First Day on the Eastern Front, que ya se puede reservar, marcará un hito en la literatura militar sobre Barbarroja.

Saludos cordiales
JL
"Dioses, no me juzguéis como un dios
sino como un hombre
a quien ha destrozado el mar" (Plegaria fenicia)

Avatar de Usuario
José Luis
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 9226
Registrado: Sab Jun 11, 2005 3:06 am
Ubicación: España

Re: Entrevista al Dr. Craig W. H. Luther

Mensaje por José Luis » Vie Sep 21, 2018 10:06 am

¡Hola a todos!

Poco después de la publicación del Barbarossa Unleashed se publicaron algunos libros más sobre la Operación Barbarroja, ninguno de ellos a la altura del trabajo académico del Dr, Luther en su libro. A modo de ejemplo, y de notable contraste, me gustaría comentar muy brevemente los dos que más han trascendido.

Frank Ellis, Barbarossa 1941: Reframing Hitler's Invasion of Stalin's Soviet Empire (Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 2015). Las tesis que Ellis presenta en su libro son, en su mayoría, insostenibles o carentes de evidencia documental contrastada, por lo que su trabajo, en mi opinión, no deja de ser un intento de revisionismo que desprende cierto tufo ideológico: la impresión es que Ellis intenta motivar las órdenes criminales de Hitler (Orden de los Comisarios, especialmente) para la Operación Barbarroja como resultado del supuesto conocimiento alemán, ya en 1940, de los asesinatos de oficiales polacos en Katyn por los soviéticos ese mismo año, así como por el conocimiento alemán de los crímenes de estado de Stalin (purgas políticas y militares, hambruna de Ucrania, Gulag, etc.). Lo que parece ignorar Ellis, consciente o inconscientemente, es que las órdenes criminales de Hitler para la invasión de la Unión Soviética formaban parte de otra serie de medidas criminales para esta guerra de aniquilación (Generalplan Ost, Einsatzgruppen, o, por abreviar, la política genocida nazi para esta guerra de exterminio), y, en tal sentido, no se pueden analizar fuera de su contexto. En otras palabras, forman parte integral de la política de guerra de exterminio nazi para la Operación Barbarroja. Ellis pretende igualmente justificar la invasión nazi de la Unión Soviética como una guerra preventiva, esto es dando pábulo al más que refutado montaje de Viktor Suvorov, dedicándole un capítulo entero.

En resumidas cuentas, este autor hace un uso arbitrario y parcial de fuentes soviéticas (desechando e ignorando las que contradicen sus tesis) que presenta como novedosas (pero que llevan muchos años a disposición de los especialistas) y analiza superficialmente y sin tomarse la molestia de someterlas al tamizado, contrastándolas con otras fuentes primarias soviéticas. La impresión que me ha causado este muy deficiente libro es que su autor partió de unas ideas preconcebidas y simplemente buscó encontrar (algo nada difícil) entre algunas fuentes soviéticas aquellas “pruebas” que servían para defender dichas ideas preconcebidas, ignorando la avalancha de pruebas documentales que echan por tierra sus infundadas tesis. Es un libro perfectamente prescindible.

Gregory Liedtke, Enduring the Whirlwind: The German Military and the Russo-German War 1941-1943 (Helion & Company, 2016) es un libro que no tiene nada que ver con el anterior, pues pese a que su tesis principal es del todo cuestionable, contiene un montón de información sobre fuerzas de personal y material a diferentes niveles (fundamentalmente unitarios) que son del todo útiles para el aficionado a este conflicto (que el autor centra en 1941-1943). El objetivo de este libro, según su autor, “es abordar la percepción de la debilidad numérica en términos de la capacidad alemana para reemplazar sus pérdidas y regenerar su fuerza militar, y valorar lo correcto de este argumento durante la primera mitad de la guerra ruso-alemana (Junio 1941-Junio 1943)”. Liedtke cree que se ha exagerado esta debilidad numérica y que los alemanes consiguieron reemplazar, en grado satisfactorio, sus pérdidas en hombres y material. Su libro intenta demostrarlo. El problema de Liedtke, tirando de una frase proverbial, es que las hojas no le dejan ver el bosque, perdiéndose en el detalle en detrimento del contexto estratégico, que es donde residen las verdaderas causas del fracaso alemán, incluyendo su incapacidad para reemplazar, en el grado requerido, sus pérdidas en personal y material de guerra.

En cambio, el Barbarossa Unleashed del Dr. Luther sigue y se suma así a la senda iniciada por David Glantz y sus dos volúmenes de Barbarossa Derailed (2010 y 2012) más los dos volúmenes de acompañamiento (2014 y 2015), y David Stahel en su Operation Barbarossa and Germany's Defeat in the East (2009) y sus siguientes libros sobre Kiev (2012) y Typhoon (2013) (en 2015 se publicaría su libro sobre la batalla de Moscú), que son los dos grandes hitos recientes en la revaluación de la Operación Barbarroja despojada de sus mitos alemanes y soviéticos, y vaciada de la aceptación acrítica de las memorias de generales y mariscales alemanes y relatos y estudios de los oficiales alemanes bajo la supervisión de Halder bajo el patrocinio del ejército estadounidense que, todo en su conjunto, ha dominado la mayor parte de la historiografía de la Operación Barbarroja. De ahí la importancia de la contribución del Dr. Luther.

Saludos cordiales
JL
"Dioses, no me juzguéis como un dios
sino como un hombre
a quien ha destrozado el mar" (Plegaria fenicia)

Avatar de Usuario
David L
Administrador
Administrador
Mensajes: 2333
Registrado: Mar Oct 11, 2005 4:23 am
Contactar:

Re: Entrevista al Dr. Craig W. H. Luther

Mensaje por David L » Vie Sep 21, 2018 8:12 pm

Muchas gracias José Luis por esta grata contribución y también hacerlas extensivas al Dr. Craig W. H. Luther por su amabilidad y generosidad en compartir en nuestro foro sus impresiones sobre Barbarroja. Felicidades.
Os dieron a elegir entre el deshonor y la guerra... elegisteis el deshonor y tendréis la guerra.

Winston Churchill a Chamberlain.

Responder

Volver a “Biblioteca”

TEST